Natalie Christensen: Last Night I Dreamt I Knew How to Swim

Monday May 6, 2019

Additional Dates:


725 Canyon Rd
Santa Fe, NM 87501
US

Phone: (505) 986-9800
Website: Click to Visit

Ages:

ALL-AGES!

Contact:

Shastyn Blomquist

Phone: 505-986-9800
Website: Click to Visit

More events at Turner Carroll Gallery

Runs through 05/13/2019.

Natalie Christensen, Last Night I Dreamt I Knew How To Swim, archival pigment print on 100% Italian cotton rag paper, with satin UV lamination, mounted to dibond, in shadow box frame, 17.75 x 21.5 x 1.5 in., 2019

Public Openings: Friday, April 19, 2019, 5-8 pm at El Rey Court and Saturday, April 20, 2019, 5-7pm at Turner Carroll Gallery

In Natalie Christensen's images, pools serve as reflective places of consciousness, the subconscious and the unconscious or unknowable self, where Christensen invites the viewer to dare to dive into the depths. The exhibition at Turner Carroll Gallery is held in conjunction with Natalie Christensen and Jim Eyre’s exhibition of collaborative images presented in an unorthodox gallery viewing environment: the walls of an empty swimming pool at the El Rey Court hotel in Santa Fe. alteredstates/alteredscapes is a three-pronged, collaborative photography project from Natalie Christensen (Santa Fe, NM) and Jim Eyre (London, UK) that positions Santa Fe as the physical location from which to engage a global audience, using Instagram to explore and distribute the project’s ideas. The project is comprised of a site-specific exterior wheat paste mural, and digital display via a website and public Instagram feed. Referencing a 1980s horror film in which the main character gets lost in visual dreamscapes via sensory deprivation experiments, alteredstates/alteredscapes aims to make public and visible the psychological impact of sharing and viewing art on social media.

Christensen and Eyre met over Instagram and initiated a collaboration based on their shared ambivalence of using the social media platform to view and share contemporary photography. alteredstates/alteredscapes was born from the artists’ main question: Is the unrelenting momentum of the virtual space stifling their creativity or, conversely, are they becoming better artists by the pressure to produce and compete for recognition on the digital stage?

The project is comprised of composite photography of New Mexico and London. To create the final images, the artists began passing their respective photographs—shots of their urban surroundings—back and forth via Instagram direct message. At each turn, the artists digitally cropped, collaged, or otherwise altered the images, shaping them by trial and error, layer upon layer. As a result, the images contain familiar tropes yet are oddly disorienting—architectural fragments and street elements meld together to present multiple points of view and subtle combinations of perspectives on a single visual plane, representing a malleable psychological experience. The artists willingly created these artworks through a laborious, tedious, rigorous process to share with a global audience, knowing that those who view them will do so in a split second and dispose of them with a flick of their thumb.

Artwork in the Last Night I Dreamt I Knew How to Swim exhibition may be viewed here