Asteroid Day

Comet Me, Bro!

Image via Pixabay

It's never too early to start planning for your last moments on Earth, so zoom over to Asteroid Day. This event rocks the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science from 10am to 2pm on Sunday, June 30. Learn about asteroids and their impacts on Earth, NASA's mission to our local asteroid belt, the disappearance of the dinosaurs and other space news. Watch live streaming of other Asteroid Day celebrations worldwide (yes, that's a thing). UNM's Institute of Meteoritics helps visitors distinguish between meteorites and regular, old Earth rocks and the curator of the exhibition, Dr. Tom Prettyman, hosts an "Asteroid Advice Booth." All activities are included in museum admission. Admission prices range from $4 to $10. For more information on this all-ages event visit nmnaturalhistory.org. (Xanthe Miller)

Sunday June 30, 2019

1801 Mountain Rd NW
Albuquerque, NM 87104
US

Phone: 841-2802
Website: Click to Visit

See also: Found Objects

Lose Sleep Over This

asteroid map
NASA/JPL-Caltech

Of the big ones (more than 100 meters), there are over 150 million asteroids orbiting around our very own solar system. How likely is it that one will crash into the Earth and kill everyone on the planet? You can make that your very first question to a friendly docent when you walk in the door at Asteroid Day on Sunday, June 30 from 10am to 2pm at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science (1801 Mountain Rd. NW). Got even more concerns? Then seek out the curator of the exhibition, Dr. Tom Prettyman, on hand to answer questions at an “Asteroid Advice Booth.” This international event is all part of a campaign to “educate people worldwide about asteroids, the impact hazard they may pose, and what we can do to protect our planet, families, communities, and future generations.” The odds are looking good, so don’t miss out on this all-ages event that is included with your museum admission. For more information (about the event, not how to survive an impact event), see nmnaturalhistory.org.

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