PLEASE NOTE!
Due to the March 23, 2020 NM DOH Public Health Order, These Event Listings Are Not Accurate!
All non-essential businesses are closed, public gatherings are prohibited!
(One day some of these events will be rescheduled or will resume, but they are not happening now!)

Arts events


Wednesday Dec 19, 2018
  • 70 Years of Soul

    Photo courtesy of the artist

    Sometimes this city lacks the authentic soul and gospel that is a dime a dozen in the Midwestern and Southern parts of the US. The National Hispanic Cultural Center continues to provide us with some of the most exquisitely diverse and magnetic art that passes through fair Burque. The Blind Boys of Alabama, and yes the original members were all blind, are hitting town and bringing their 70 years of gospel, soul and R&B history with them. Support the boys on tour in conjunction with their latest holiday release, Talkin' Christmas. On Wednesday, Dec. 19 all ages can take in the five-time Grammy winners that Rolling Stone Magazine calls “gospel titans.” Doors open at 7pm with the show beginning at 7:30pm. The evening can be enjoyed from $36 to $51 per seat. (Mayo Lua de Frenchie)

    National Hispanic Cultural Center
    Blind Boys of Alabama
Friday Dec 21, 2018
  • Zeroes, One and Disruption

    Image via Pixabay

    One of the best things about artists is their ability to adjust to whatever new media come along. Ergo, great stories get told on paper, or on screens, just as they did on cave walls. Nowhere is the exploration of artistry evolving faster than in the digital realm. This concept is being explored by 10 fine artists from around the United States, in the exhibition Digital Disobedience: The Algorithm as Saboteur, curated by UNM’s Amy Traylor, Experimental Art and Technology MFA student, and Cat Hulshoff, PhD Art History student. Running now through Dec. 30 at the CFA Downtown Studio, the show tackles what it means to disrupt the world of, and through, technology in contemporary society. This show is free and open to all ages. Gallery hours are Fridays and Saturdays, 11am to 6pm. (Alisa Valdes)

    CFA Downtown
    ONGOING
    Digital Disobedience: The Algorithm as Saboteur
  • Life Could Be a Dream

    Image courtesy of the artist

    Doo-Wop is a form of American music whose development closely followed that of rock and roll in the middle of the 20th century, but actually began on the streets of Nueva York in the '40s. Imbued with multi-part harmonies and an attention to lush melodicism that dives deep into the romantic reservoir of the nation, the doo-wop movement produced artists like The Chords, who wrote a nifty tune called “Sh-Boom.” This vocal excursion was followed by classics of the genre, like “Book of Love” by The Monotones in 1958. Though the genre faded—along with a lot of other subgenres—with the British Invasion, it's been resurrected many times in the intervening years. And while decidedly non-American acts like The King Khan and BBQ Show have actually evolved the sound toward higher levels, traditionalists like The Doo-Wop Project continue to produce pure iterations of the famous sound of legends like The Four Seasons and The Marcels. The Doo-Wop Project performs a program of their versions of contemporary pop favorites laced with seasonal favorites on Friday, Dec. 21 at 7pm at Popejoy Hall on the UNM campus. Tickets range in price from $25 to $64, so do go: it's like paradise up above. (August March)

    Popejoy Hall
    The Doo-Wop Project Christmas
Saturday Dec 22, 2018
Sunday Dec 23, 2018
  • Seriously Cozy Fun

    Image courtesy of Indian Pueblo Cultural Center

    Traditional Pueblo culture places great value on storytelling as a means of entertainment, education and community, with storyteller being a venerated role canonized in the playful storyteller sculptures found in galleries and homes across this region. This tradition is on full, living, cozy display at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center this month, with Stories by the Fireside, every Sundayfrom 5 to 6pm. All ages are welcome to attend these free hearthside storytelling presentations, some accompanied by hands-on crafts, and all replete with hot cocoa. This week's story comes from the book Wild Wisdom: Animal Stories of the Southwest, by Rae Ann Kumelos, and includes an animal stencil craft activity, using tissue paper. Only two dates are left this month, so head out on Dec. 23 or Dec. 30 for a cozy evening with the fam. (Alisa Valdes)

    Indian Pueblo Cultural Center
    Stories by the Fireside

Arts events