Lady Gaga


V.20 No.13 | 3/31/2011

news

The Daily Word, starring Robert Gibbs, Lady Gaga and Randy Quaid.

The Daily Word

A deadly Egyptian cobra is loose in the Bronx Zoo.

Facebook may hire Robert Gibbs, Obama’s former press secretary.

Teens get sad when they can’t tell Facebook is full of phoneys.

What the heck is Earth Hour? I guess it was Saturday.

Scientists have created an amazing plastic from fruit fibers and this is the last you will ever hear of it.

Learn how to write a Manifesto and read some that others have written.

All animals are tasty in a city under siege.

Urine-boiled eggs are also tasty, but the recipe is hard to read.

Hear the song “Star Whackers” by Randy Quaid.

See the Colorado UFO.

A misunderstanding caused Tolkein to reject Maurice Sendak’s Hobbit illustrations.

There were almost some snakes on a plane.

Big Brother tracks you with your cell phone.

There’s a magazine for the gay military.

Share in the scientific passion for severed heads.

I ain’t gonna pee pee my bed tonight.

Vandals hit the Albuquerque Karting Club hard!

DCF reports on crippling new developments in the Lead/Coal Construction.

Something might finally happen with the Anasazi building.

Albuquerque may get a new nudie bar.

A drunk driver hit five people in a parking lot at 4770 Montgomery (Graham Central Station?) yesterday.

Take Ben Radford’s Chupa Challenge for a quick $250.

Happy birthday, Lady Gaga.

Thanks to Geoffrey Anjou and Tom Nayder for today’s un-boring links.

V.19 No.51 |

news

The Daily Word 12.23.10: Warm x-mas, Obama FTW, Ozzy on Gaga

The Daily Word

Hot December. White x-mas.

Is it getting hotter everywhere?

Gustavo Arellano of Ask A Mexican! travels to the birthplace of Taco Bell.

Powder in the stockings. Not snow.

HuffPo slaps WaPo around about the paper's chain of for-profit colleges.

Richardson on Richardson.

North Korea threatens to use nukes.

She refused to cheer for an athlete she said raped her. The Supreme Court will decide if it's a free speech case.

9-year-old chess prodigy.

How Obama turned it around.

Ozzy Osbourne still exists, is sick of Lady Gaga.

Restaurant reviewer's anonymity destroyed as she's kicked out of an eatery.

We used to sleep with other kinds of humans.

The best and worst movies of 2010.

V.19 No.37 | 9/16/2010

news

The Daily Word 9.13.10: robot skin, Hitler liked Disney, and Aldous Huxley died on Acid.

The Daily Word

Watch a video of the San Bruno gas explosion.

Not everyone loves Lady Gaga.

Delicious, crispy robot skin can feel pleasure and pain. Pressure, anyway.

Six tyrants and their secret hobbies.

Party down with new iris scanners.

Aldous Huxley died on acid. Acid in a Gummi Bear?

Can you regrow a chopped off fingertip?

The chupacabras is real! Maybe it’s not!

Ima let you finish.”

Halo Reach comes out at midnight tonight.

Police may have captured the Silver Van Del Taco Rapist.

The Rafael del Pino Foundation is paying for Bill’s trip to Spain.

Martinez wants to repeal medical marijuana.

Happy birthday, Fiona Apple.

V.19 No.31 |

News

The Daily Word 08.09.10: Corn syrup & cancer, Gaga, mega-early puberty,

The Daily Word

Police say these prison escapees killed people in New Mexico. They're looking for them in Yellowstone.

Car smash through diner.

You don't have to have surgery to change your gender on your N.M. driver's license.

Guy throws big rocks at credit union, breaks 10 windows, say coppers.

Doug Vaughan's luxury items were mostly owned by banks and such. (Investors, "uh … ".)

Video of the feral hogs in the Rio Grande Valley.

Here's an ugly gig: Convince Americans to support the Afghan war. Good luck, Petraeus.

College students: NYT tips on finding cheap textbooks. (Friggin' racket.)

Gulf residents' wary of government and BP promise to stay until the job is done.

Puberty at 7.

Cancer cells really dig fructose and use it to divide and spread. (Think corn syrup.)

Lady Gaga (NSFW) crowdsurfed at Lollapalooza during the Semi-Precious Weapons set. That band was totally at Burt's on a weeknight about a year and a half ago for the Hell on Heels Tour. You should go out on Tuesdays.

Naked rollercoaster record.

V.18 No.43 | 10/22/2009
The movement
[click to enlarge]
Maren Tarro

Just Say Yes

The struggle for LGBT rights hits home

When Alibi news editor Marisa Demarco asked if I would cover the National Equality March in D.C. I quickly responded with a great big “Yes”. Nevermind the march took place the weekend I was scheduled to be hauling all my earthly belongings into my new apartment outside Baltimore, and never mind I’d never actually been to D.C. before. I was excited for the opportunity to document this event. (See the piece and other photos here.)

And then, as I started working on the article, a phone interview with One Struggle, One Fight–New Mexico’s Kelly Hutton caused me to seriously think about attending the march as more than a reporter. Her infectious enthusiasm got to me. “Please! Come march with us,” Hutton encouraged me, and her invitation echoed in my thoughts as I made my travel plans.

Additional pressure came in a phone call from my mother who reminded me I had many LGBT friends and family members who would be unable to make it to D.C. The weight on my shoulders was growing heavy. I could have easily shrugged it off by telling myself I was a reporter; my job was to attend as an objective observer and nothing more.

But I couldn’t. My conscience wouldn’t be that easily appeased.

So, I marched. I marched in between climbing walls to get the best shots I could, between hanging off light posts to get just the right angle and between tracking down activists from New Mexico. I ran alongside marchers, doubling back to snap photos of clever signs and then hurrying to catch up to marchers arriving at the Capitol. I jumped on and off cement barriers and planters, jogged backwards to catch groups caught up in the moment and ended up with a stress fracture in my left foot. But I marched.

I marched for my aunt Gloria who died last year after a fiercely short battle with ovarian cancer. I marched for her partner Deanna who was referred to only as “friend” and “roommate” at Gloria’s Catholic funeral.

I marched for my HIV-positive cousin Mari, the first transgender person I’d ever met. As I child, I was endlessly fascinated by him, putting him on my list of things to ponder between Boy George and God.

I marched for my cousin Felix, a young lesbian who I have so much admiration for. She is unapologetic for her identity even to her devoutly Catholic family.

I marched for all my LGBT friends over the years who are too numerous to name. But I will make special mention of John Cook, a nurse and teacher who may very well be the best drinking buddy a gal can have.

And I marched for all those who made their way to D.C. to support their community. For the military personnel thrown out under DADT, for the young people bullied in school over their sexuality, the parents who aren’t recognized as parents under current laws, partners who are refused the right to be at their loved one’s sides in hospitals, those ostracized in their churches and the countless others who find themselves denied anything based on their orientation, I marched.

The march continues. Now is the time to write letters to our senators, representatives and councilmen. Now is the time to tell everyone you know to support our friends and family in their old-as-time struggle for equal treatment under the law.

I marched for my loved ones, but will you?

V.18 No.42 | 10/15/2009
“We're here, we're queer!” Marchers arrive at the Capitol and pack the lawn with several blocks of Pennsylvania Avenue still filled with marchers.
[click to enlarge]
Maren Tarro

News Feature

They’re Here, They’re Queer—They’re Grassroots

New Mexicans join the national march for LGBT rights

WASHINGTON, D.C.They voted for change when they voted for Obama. Now, the LGBT community is making its growing impatience with the president heard. But calling for the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell and the Defense of Marriage Act weren't the only reasons tens of thousands gathered in D.C. to put pressure on Washington. Unlike previous gay rights marches, the National Equality March on Oct. 10 and 11 was largely a grassroots effort, perhaps signaling a change in how the community—specifically the younger generation—will tackle equality issues.

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