New Mexico

New Mexico


V.25 No.44 | 11/03/2016
Private Universe: Galaxy #9
Courtesy of Richard Levy Gallery

Anniversary Interview

Featuring Richard Levy Gallery

To celebrate our 25th year properly here at the Weekly Alibi, we're conducting a series of interviews with local businesses and institutions that we've grown with and that have contributed to the growth of our wonderful city.

For our first interview, Calendars Editor Megan Reneau met up with Richard Levy and Vivette Hunt of the renowned contemporary Richard Levy Gallery located at 514 Central SWto ask them a few questions about their 25 years Downtown, the community, art and how it all intersects.


Alibi: What brought you to Albuquerque?

Richard: I went to school in San Francisco for a couple years and then transferred to UNM. I took a couple years worth of English and then decided to switch to art because I grew up in a house with parents who are collectors, so it was a natural transition for me.

That led to becoming a photographer. And I hook rugs … it's a very Northeastern, little old lady sport. It takes me about a year to make a rug. After UNM I opened an antique store … by the Guild. I was attracted to the idea—to graphics of different kinds—so I sold antique photographs, I used to buy old Vogue magazines from the '20s when they were silk screened and made in Paris. By the end of that store, I was selling silk screens and sort of limited edition posters by Warhol, Lichtenstein, Jasper Johns, you know, all the classics ...

Vivette: Richard's good at finding things.

Richard: Anything. I can find a source for anything. So in the antique business and in this business, it's a good skill to have.

Alibi: How has Downtown changed in the last 25 years?

Richard Levy: I was going to buy the building and not remodel it but someone else was bidding on the building, as well—my home contractor. He just happened to be working on our house at the same time as all this was going on. I called him and told him I was buying this building and there was silence at the other end. His wife suggested that we buy it together and add a second story.

Alibi: So it's changed a lot.

Richard: Yeah. At the time [JC] Penny's was Downtown but they were leaving.

This was an architecture firm [in the building RLG occupies] and they were just leaving, as well, I mean—mostly people were leaving Downtown then—so I saw that as an opportunity to buy a building at the right moment. I intended to start as a print gallery by appointment only.

Vivette: And that came out of Richard being a publisher.

Richard: I was familiar with what Tamarind was publishing. I knew some other publishers in San Francisco—I knew I could buy their prints and resell them. There was huge demand in those days. People would publish print editions and they would be sold out in a minute. So I started that way, just buying prints and reselling them in very short order.

Alibi: What's your process for collecting the art that will be featured?

Vivette: We're constantly feeling for visual information. If we like something or if we see how it would maybe fit into a project—for example, our next exhibition is snow flakes, it's going to be called “Let it Snow.” We'll fill the gallery with snowflake imagery, so knowing that that's happening, we start scanning. And, you know, Richard's been doing his internet sleuthing [laughs], so it happens in different ways. We have projects in mind, sort of peripherally on our radar, maybe a year or two out once we encounter different types of art. This exhibition is not a great example because this is a celebration of 25 years and celebrating 25 years, you bring a lot of information together.

Richard: Yeah, this exhibition isn’t an example because this is all over the place. What we do is very curated.

Alibi: How does the theme of this relate to the charity We Are This City that you guys are working with?

Vivette: We really wanted to make this exhibition feel more like a community celebration because it’s about the gallery being Downtown for 25 years, so it was important for us to include the artists that we represent today. Our program is a mix of things that Richard finds that we resale blended with artists that we actually work with and consign our art from, so we are career building but we are also making secondary sales.

This show does also reflect that balance in our program. When we go to an art fair, generally a booth presentation will include secondary market and artists that we’re directly working with so we bring them together. We wanted that balance to be reflected in the exhibition well. And Richard is a collector, so we sort of wanted to put a little bit of that aspect of his personality in—the baseballs, that’s a collection of his, so it’s sort of bringing different components that all sort of fit with it being a community celebration.

We’d been looking for the right partner—Richard and I have been talking about this for a while—we finalized that partnership in May or June. We Are This City was interesting to us because of their arts and cultural overlap, but it’s very different: It's very millennial-based. It seemed like a good fit for us, bringing our two networks together.

Alibi: Has changing media impacted your business?

Richard: Oh totally. When I first started—I mean, there were computers—but everything was very old fashioned. To get things printed, you had to go to the print shop and they would have to have things photographed—you didn’t bring them files. Nobody did anything over the internet because most people barely had AOL.

Vivette: When I got here in 2000—even at that time—we'd get a piece of art in, we’d have to load it up in the truck and take it to the photographer and the photographer would photograph it, we would get slides then get the slides digitized... But even at that time, a very small percentage of our collectors were actually looking at art online even though that was for putting it on the website. We weren’t really sending a lot of images. Now most of our sales are online.

Richard: That didn’t happen till a couple years ago.

Vivette: Yeah, that’s a trend that’s really solidified in the last five years.

Richard: But we still go to a lot of fairs. We show up with a bunch of crates and we fill a 20x24-foot space in New York or wherever, Dallas, Seattle or Miami—they’re all destination cities at the right time of year. And we see 10,000, 15-, 20-, 25,000 people at those.

Alibi: That’s a lot.

Richard: Those are people who are committed to art in some way. People still need people to look at the artwork and see what the painting’s like. You can’t really understand paintings online, the brush strokes, you know it's...

Alibi: Yeah, it’s a completely different thing seeing it in person. But it sounds like changing media has impacted your business a lot, has that change affected the art that you've received or that you’re interested in?

Richard: It’s certainly changed photography. It’s much easier to print out photographs and everything photography became digital, but as far as painting and prints, prints have changed too because it’s—

Vivette: Open to the digital world. Some painters that use technology to expand their toolset, like Beau Carey is a very traditional painter but, that being said, when I see this landscape painting here on the wall (Mt. Analogue, 2016), I can’t help but think it’s somehow influenced by looking at digital information.

Richard: But that’s just the collective unconscious. That's everybody being online and looking at stuff. But when it comes down to painting, you still have to paint.

Vivette: Yeah, you still have to pick up the brush. It's just the way you're conceptually connecting the dots. On the other side, we have a painter that we represent that has modified a CNC router which is driven by software. They generally cut special shapes but he modified it and put a robotic arm so it does an individual paint drop application and he writes the software to tell it what to do. So I mean, he's painting but he's not picking up a brush ... it's definitely a creative process.

Alibi: Why is the art scene so different from Santa Fe?

Vivette: Albuquerque is a much more affordable place to live and allows a creative community of many, many different income brackets to be established here. Santa Fe is a little priced out and not accessible to such a diverse group of people.

Richard: The Santa Fe market really started with the more traditional New Mexican, classic kind of images that were more expensive and a little more traditional—

Vivette: And a little more conservative. There’s more room for experimentation here with the universities pushing intellectual, conceptual and—again—economic boundaries. If you're not under the gun to pay huge overhead on your studio space, you can afford to take a few more risks. It allows room to be more experimental.

Alibi: Has the Alibi influenced the art scene in Albuquerque?

Vivette: Yeah, it’s helped get people to events.

Richard: Yeah, and when they started and when we started, we used to do art walks. The city arts organization did that. The city was divided into three or four sectors so the Northeast Heights had one and Downtown and the University area together had one and the Valley had one. I think that was it. And we used to do them regularly. Everybody in the area would be open on a certain day, and we would take out ads together and that was in the calendar section and that’s how people knew about that stuff.

V.25 No.43 | 10/27/2016

Seasons Change

Early Voting Edition

So you've probably heard of this crazy thing called early voting... ever tried it? I have. It's totally the best. You get hit with a rush of patriotic power, like, as soon as you walk in because you get to vote almost as soon as you walk in.

Seriously, though, I highly recommend it. The longest I've ever had to wait for early voting was maybe three minutes. Compared to what I saw for the primary election earlier this year—crazy long lines and wait times—and, personally, I expect there will more people this time around.

Early voting is easy. You can literally google, “early voting near me” and polling stations near you will come up on your screen. Go here and they'll even tell you what the wait time currently is! If you're concerned about time, your employer legally has to give you time off to vote.

Voting is important, particularly this election cycle. Please vote. And the sooner, the better. Good luck fam. Early voting ends Nov. 5.

V.25 No.42 | 10/20/2016

Event Horizon

Anthro on the Streets

Friday, Oct 28: Spreading the Gospel: Graffiti and the Public Space

Learn about the complexities of public representation and contestation among ideological factions in the Balkans. Runs through 10/31.

Event Horizon

Rock and Roll and Education

Thursday, Oct 27: Let's Roll This Train: My Life in New Mexico Education, Business, and Politics

Lenton Malry talks about and signs his memoir.
V.25 No.40 | 10/06/2016

Event Horizon

Dam Dam Dam

Saturday, Oct 15: Centennial Celebration

Shop a unique collection of vendors with handcrafted and vintage goods, food vendors, a beer and wine tent as well as a dedicated kid's area, yoga workshops and magic shows.

Event Horizon

Apples, Pumpkins, Autumn, Oh My!

Saturday, Oct 8: Third Annual Apple and Pumpkin Fest

Apple picking and orchard tours, fresh apple cider, hay rides, choose a pumpkin from the pumpkin patch, green chile roasting, ristras, live entertainment and more.
V.25 No.38 | 09/22/2016

Event Horizon

"A Lot About Living"

Friday, Sep 30: Alan Jackson

Enjoy honky tonk tunes from the country music legend.

Event Horizon

Got Minerals?

Friday, Sep 30: Fall Gem, Mineral and Jewelry Show

Browse gemstones, mineral specimens, rough rock, slabs, jewelry, beads, cabochons, fossils, tools and equipment.
V.25 No.37 | 09/15/2016

Event Horizon

Steamed Cheese

Saturday, Sep 24: Steampunk Spectacular 5: Cthulhu's Revenge

A science-fiction themed day of workshops, costume contests and entertainment. Teens allowed if accompanied by an adult.
V.25 No.36 | 09/08/2016

The Daily Word in Facebook, Literal Blazin' and Spoopy Things

The Daily Word

Blaze it but not like this.

What happens when the downstairs goes into the upstairs?

How spoopy was The Blair Witch Project in real life?

Down with data caps!

#omg You need to watch this short film Carrie Brownstein made #iLiterallyCannot

Facebook is comin' to New Mexico!

Weekly Weather Report

Week of Sept. 13-19

Today through Thursday it will be partly cloudy with a high of about 82° and not much of a chance of precipitation throughout the day. Friday will be sunny with a high of 83°. Saturday thunderstorms should pop up across the world, particularly on the East Side of Albuquerque, causing damnation for about 50-90% of the Earth's population (pesky holy water monsoons). Skies clear up for the end of the weekend on through to next week. See you next week, sinner!

Tourist in her own Town

Another Weekend in Review

Revisiting Albuquerque like it was the first time

News

The Daily Word in Sosa, Luhan, Johnson, Balderas, the state fair and trout

The Daily Word

Influential New Mexican civil rights leader, former NM Supreme Court Justice, World War II fighter pilot and all around chingón Dan Sosa Jr. died at age 92. He passed through the gate while residing in the same home he was born at, an adobe home in Las Cruces built by his abuelo in the mid 19th century.

Over at the local daily, Winthrop Quigley writes lovingly about New Mexico icon Mabel Dodge Luhan and her inimitable influence on American intellectual and cultural thinking.

Former New Mexico Governor and Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson took a serious, foreign-policy related stumble while visiting with the folks at MSNBC.

The New Mexico State Fair comes but once a year; now it's here, now it's here.

Our state's Attorney General, Hector Balderas, wrote to the US Department of Education yesterday, asking them to protect students following the sudden closure of for-profit college ITT Tech, which had a campus in Burque.

Netflix new Western, "Godless," began filming in the land of enchantment this week.

Meanwhile, Thomas Lee at the San Francisco Chronicle says a "demonstration city" to be built in New Mexico faces "long odds."

The economy of Milan, New Mexico may suffer because of the Department of Justice decision to phase out private prisons across the United States.

"Roylee Luna of Albuquerque caught and released a 22-inch lake trout while fishing the river below Heron Dam on Sunday. He was using a black woolly bugger."


V.25 No.34 | 08/25/2016
Courtesy of Noah McLaurine

Event Horizon

Reaching a Crescendo

Friday, Sep 2: [Tension-Building Music] Opening Reception

The recent work of Noah McLaurine, featuring photographs of public lands and monuments in New Mexico. Runs through 11/5.

Weekly Weather Report

Week of Aug. 30-Sep. 5

Clouds have been rolling through the metro area all day, so there's seemingly a chance of rain this afternoon. Yesterday it was the same situation but someone decided not to follow through with the rain so we all just had to watch it pass us by. Maybe someone will follow through with the signs that they give today. Tomorrow will be about the same, so we have that to look forward to. Things are going to start to heat up on Friday with a high of 86 degrees Fahrenheit, so don't throw your summer wardrobe in the trash compacter, yet (though advised by The City Fashion Council). Next week will be sunny with mild temps, almost like autumn really exists. But of course it does. We aren't all bodies floating in goo being prodded at by reptilian aliens.