internet


V.19 No.47 | 11/25/2010
Commissioner Michael Copps spoke to a crowd of more than 400 at the National Hispanic Cultural Center.
Sam Adams

Newscity

Not Just Net Neutral

FCC commissioner rallies New Mexicans around Internet freedom but remains silent on plans

Michael Copps of the Federal Communications Commission had a lot to say about the importance of access to information and the Internet. But he remained tight-lipped on how and when the FCC would protect it.

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V.19 No.34 |

news

The Daily Word 8.27.2010: No porn for N. Korea, anti-dope dealers, American's are dumb

The Daily Word

And you thought your internet connection was crap.

Newsflash: Pot dealers don't want weed legalized.

Susana Martinez leads Diane Denish, among people who take polls.

Why won't that Chinese dude buy your house? Because the feng shui is all f'd up.

This Japanese guy calls Americans something mean.

Let's feed him to the Germans!

Tourism in Guam goes up.

No PowerPoint, no killing people. Got it?

75 Rio Rancho kids had the crap scared out of them this morning. Oh, and there's probably a job opening for a new bus driver.

Cash for cocks! (Totally safe for work, I promise.)

Guess what's under the World Trade Center site? Hint: It's not a mosque.

Bike helmets are stupid.

Whoo hoo! The internet is crazy again.

Happy Friday.

V.19 No.25 | 6/24/2010

WWW

Pidgin: An Instant Messaging Aggregate You’ll Like and Use

Every major Internet-based company seems to be trying to the same thing. Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, AOL—everybody is in a race to be your online content hub. Each company has their own mail service, their own news center, their own shopping portal ... and the result is that internet users accumulate accounts, signing up for the latest and greatest service only to move on once another company releases something better. I talk to friends and acquaintances online, but managing three different online communication accounts just wasn't fun. You can imagine the traditional comically inept infomercial actor, exasperatedly searching for Facebook on my row of browser tabs to use their chat service and accidentally closing other important ones, hunting for the Google Talk icon in my quick launch bar and accidentally deleting the contents of my hard drive ...

“If only there was a better way!”

Guess what, readers—for about seven months, I've been using a desktop-based instant messaging client called Pidgin, which has support for every popular chat program, and some you probably haven't even heard of. Desktop instant messaging clients are a good way to consolidate unwieldy lists of accounts across major service providers into a single location. What finally drove me to house all my accounts using Pidgin was its native support for Facebook chat—instructions are available directly from Facebook, not only for Pidgin but for a host of other chat programs. While this allows you to always be available to converse with friends, it does have a drawback— a friend messaged me once to ask why I was always using Facebook, because always being logged into Facebook Chat through Pidgin makes me appear to always be online.

Pidgin is also customizable through extensions, much like popular web browsers Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome, allowing users to extend the software's functionality. Pidgin is free and open source, and makes the wild world of online communication a lot simpler.

V.19 No.24 | 6/17/2010

Tech

#GeekSpeak

Internet geeks, which more and more look like a cross-section of society than the soda guzzling guy who lives in mom’s basement, got all atwitter earlier this week when the New York Times supposedly banned the word “tweet” when referring to the action of posting to Twitter. An earth-shattering controversy it’s not, but one that leads to an interesting debate (which I shall kindly spare you) about technological advances and the effect on language. By the way, New York Times writer Philip B. Corbett has responded to the drama writing, “I had suggested that outside of ornithological contexts, “tweet” should still be treated as colloquial rather than as standard English.

Uh, 140 characters or less dude. Jeez.

Anyway, if you’re a bigger fan of the word “tweet” than, say, “ornithological,” you might just want to head to the New Mexico Tweetup. From 7 p.m. to a touch before midnight Saturday, June 19 at the Hyatt (330 Tiejeras NW).

Tweeters will gather and talk to each other in person, in full sentences (maybe even a paragraph or two), no less. Talk about an experiment in language. No longer will the format be: [snarky comment] RT @whoever [headline/snarky comment] [link].

Instead, it’s going to be, “Hey, did you see that article in the New York Times about I Can Has Cheezburger?”

“No, what did it say?”

“I don’t know, I didn’t read all of it.”

[silence]

Or hopefully not.

Still not sure about the whole Twitter thing? Or maybe you’re just embarrassed by your ancient phone, which barely has texting capabilities, let alone being high tech enough to allow you to install a Tweet Deck app. Have no fear. Alibi.com will have a little widget installed on Saturday so you can keep up with all the action from the event.

For you tweeters, here’s the entirety of this article in readable (and retweetable) terms:

pbth @nytimes hater http://bit.ly/bOuY0p, @weeklyalibi will follow the #NMTweetup @HyattABQ http://bit.ly/98clsD

V.19 No.19 | 5/13/2010

WWW

The FCC Changes How It Regulates the Entire Internet

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) released its plan to change how it regulates the entire Internet yesterday, attempting to balance a its charter, which states that the FCC should keep internet regulation to a minimum, with a desire to enforce net neutrality.

The new policy only affects broadband transmissions, meaning that the actual data online won't be regulated by the FCC. Internet service providers (ISPs) will be subject to telecommunications services regulation, which currently governs land-line telephones. However, the FCC's general counsel said that only six of the 48 provisions that govern telecommunications services might apply to broadband Internet – for example, the FCC won't have the power to regulate prices. These six provisions forbid ISPs from “unreasonable denials of service and other unjust and unreasonable practices,” a response to a dispute between the FCC and Comcast, where the FCC ordered Comcast to stop limiting data-heavy Bittorrent uploads. Other provisions allow the FCC to push forward on bringing universal broadband to the United States, require ISPs to keep private information obtained from their customers private, and make broadband service accessible to the disabled. While I barely understand what's going on, most major tech blogs have weighed in, and GigaOm has found a pair of videos that attempt to explain the ruling and the situation.

The reregulation came about after the FCC discovered that Comcast was delaying Bittorrent uploads and attempted to use its power to stop the interference. When a court ruled that the FCC didn't have the authority, rather than abide by the decision, the FCC got to work changing the rules. Of course, neither side is happy; ISPs say they're worried the FCC has overstepped its bounds, while net neutrality advocates say that the FCC didn't go far enough.

V.19 No.17 | 4/29/2010
“Let’s talk about race, bay-bee. Let’s talk about you and me.”

culture

How to Talk on the Internet (About Race)

Sometimes we on the ol’ Alibi blog (not to mention maybe any blog anywhere) don’t handle discussions pertaining to race (or sexuality, or gender) very well. The answer to this isn’t to stop talking about these things, but rather, to think about appropriate way to enter into and sustain such a conversation.

Jezebel has listed 10 rules for commenting on topics regarding race. I think the most important is number one: it’s not about you personally. Learn to think and respond beyond the realm of your own experience. Certain groups should also really ruminate on the “no whiners” rule.

Somehow, I know that posting something about creating civil discussions will prompt uncivil remarks, so if you need to, have at it. Or maybe you could refine these “rules” for our own piece of webdom.

V.18 No.44 | 10/29/2009
“Yes, this is real life. Stay in your seat.”

Happy Hallow-Meme

I’m usually a pirate. As much as I love Halloween, I always forget to put any sort of forethought into 1) coming up with a costume and 2) buying the stuff necessary to pull of a costume. But I’ve got an ‘80s blousey shirt thing, striped chef pants, a bandana and boots at the ready in my closet. Voila! Pirate ad infinitum.

I know I’m not alone, because I keep seeing the same default-pirates lingering around the punch bowl year after year. It doesn’t have to be that way. Should Halloweetards like us choose to seek help, there’s the Hallow-meme Costume Builder.

21 costume “recipes” show you how to ape of-the-moment cultural items like Balloon Boy (childish clothing + Jiffy Pop container + saucer balloon from Party City) or Kanye West/Taylor Swift at the 2009 VMAs (shutter sunglasses + black collard shirt + bald head kit + toy microphone; blonde wig + meaningless award + red carpet dress), plus billions-hit YouTube staples like the wailing grape-stomping anchor lady (yellow polo shirt + khaki shorts + purple bucket + plastic grapes) or David After the Dentist (seatbelt + Florida Gators T-shirt + tooth blackener). Oolong the Pancake Bunny? Three Wolf Moon group costumes? All our fantasy friends are here. Should you need them.

V.18 No.41 | 10/8/2009

Gene Grant

"Broad" Support?

Here’s the problem with the idea of deploying broadband to “everyone,” be it Albuquerque or Pie Town: It gets policy-makers loopy. The holiest of postmodern grails, broadband for all has produced all manner of magic carpet ride promises in recent years. And some serious meltdowns. But the pull of broadband—and all its related economic and social theories—is just too juicy to resist.

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V.18 No.31 | 7/30/2009
Vanity Fair

Spam a Lot

Enterprising Vanity Fair reporter Ted Travelstead wondered what would happen if he actually responded to some of the spam mail that barraged his inbox. He discovered that the only way to stop getting spam was to answer it.

An excerpt:

Spam:

My sincere apology for my unethical/unprofessional approach to you on this very august request, however, I would respectfully request that you keep the contents of this mail exceptionally confidential and respect the confidentiality of the information made privileged, in the cause of our interaction.

“I am Mr. Gang L. Xiao, presently the Vice Chairman, Executive Operations, Bank of China Limited, Hong Kong. I am requesting your partnership and it involves securring and housing Large funds. ...

Ted:

Dear Mister Gang,

Despite your unethical approach you have me VERY intrigued with your offer. Here is my info.

Steve Plapbornadow

P.O. Box Hmickey2bones

Slurm, FL 32579

USA

How much are we talking about? And can I get an advance on it today? I need to buy some school supplies for my kids.

Love,

Steve Plapbornadow

The correspondence continued for more than a month. Read the full article here.

V.18 No.29 | 7/16/2009

China Ends Shock Treatment for Internet Addicts

China's Health Ministry told a hospital in the eastern Shandong province to stop using shock treatment for young people "addicted" to the internet.

The program was used to treat around 3,000 youths. The Health Ministry ended the program because there was no domestic or international clinical evidence that electric shock therapy helps cure Internet addiction. Well duh. Also, how do you define internet addiction?