recipe


V.21 No.23 | 6/7/2012

Food for Thought

Great Scapes

The loveliness of garlic flowers

The first time I ate garlic flowers was for breakfast on a train from Beijing to Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. The dining car didn't have a menu: You just sat down and they brought you food. A server delivered a plate of stir-fried chopped green things with pork and oyster sauce, along with a bowl of rice. It was years before that I realized that the pencil-thick green things were pieces of garlic flowers and flower stalks, collectively known as scapes.
V.21 No.20 | 5/17/2012
Saucy!
JO-H / CC BY 2.0

Food

Hollandaise for dummies

The chickens are laying again, the greens and onions are up, and the days are getting longer: Brunch season is here. I've been practicing a simple dish of poached eggs served on a bed of spinach and asparagus, garnished with crispy pieces of salt pork or bacon. Sometimes I drench the whole business in a blanket of hollandaise sauce. Or more often, it’s a blanket of failed hollandaise that I resurrect to perfection with mayonnaise and a microwave. Read all about it in this week’s Food section.

Saucy!
JO-H / CC BY 2.0

Food for Thought

Brunching With the Benedicts

Or, hollandaise for dummies

The chickens are laying again, the greens and onions are up, and the days are getting longer: Brunch season is here. I've been practicing a simple dish of poached eggs served on a bed of spinach and asparagus, garnished with crispy pieces of salt pork or bacon. Sometimes I drench the whole business in a blanket of hollandaise sauce. Or more often, it’s a blanket of failed hollandaise that I resurrect to perfection with mayonnaise and a microwave.

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V.21 No.17 | 4/26/2012
Fixin’ to grind your own hamburger?
Ari LeVaux

Food

Grind your own damn burger

Even if the weather’s not up for it tonight, you can plan on a dandy weekend for grilling burgers by fridge-defrosting a few of the neglected hunks of meat from the back of your freezer. In this week’s Food section, Ari LeVaux shares his tips on turning top round, sirloin steaks or whatever meaticles you’ve got on hand into awesome homemade patties.

Fixin’ to grind your own hamburger?
Ari LeVaux

Food for Thought

Ground and Browned

Burgers from scratch

Now seems like a good time to point out how easy it is to grind your own burger in the food processor. Grill season is starting, pink slime is everywhere and, for once, wouldn't it be nice to have a burger that isn't basically mystery meat? While most households don't have meat grinders, your old La Machine or Cuisinart can get it done like a champ.

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V.21 No.12 | 3/22/2012
A tough buck becomes soft and tender after a few hours in the Dutch oven.
Ari LeVaux

Eating In

Braise the Ante

Turning chewy, cheap cuts into lusciously flavorful food

Coffee and red wine are two of my favorite beverages to drink with meat. Given how much braising I do, it was only a matter of time until I tried braising meat in a mixture of coffee and wine. The results are exceptional: a browned, flavorful exterior and spoon-tender, succulent interior.

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V.21 No.6 | 2/9/2012
Chef Jonathan Perno
Sergio Salvador salvadorphoto.com

Eating In

A Recipe for Love

Albuquerque’s best chefs share a five-star dinner at home

All right, sweethearts, here’s the deal. Valentine’s Day is on Tuesday, which means restaurants are booked solid or filling up fast. If you haven’t already made a reservation, you could be gambling with your love life. But there’s no need to panic.

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Pretty intense
Courtesy of Posh Chocolat

Food for Thought

Chocolate’s Dark Side

The controversial life of cacao beans

Valentine's Day is the chocolate industry's holiday season. With an eye toward this February's love-fest, the International Labor Rights Forum purchased an advertising slot on a JumboTron outside the Super Bowl's Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis on which to broadcast a video calledHershey's Chocolate, Kissed by Child Labor.”

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V.21 No.5 | 2/2/2012
Jasmine&Roses, flickr.com

Food

Breaking down Brussels sprouts

This week, Ari shares his best tips on handling these surprisingly versatile and long-storing miniature cabbages, including a secret cooking trick he picked up at hunting camp. He must really like you guys.

V.21 No.4 | 1/26/2012
Ari LeVaux

Eating In

Vegan or Bacon?

Brussels sprouts swing both ways

Brussels sprouts with bacon is hardly a new idea, but the combination has taken off lately. Now the pairing is a menu meme, a darling of online recipe searches and food TV. But those green brassica balls also go effortlessly and deliciously, for example, in that most vegetarian of dishes: the leafy salad.

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V.20 No.46 | 11/17/2011
There’s chocolate in that there squash.
Ari LeVaux

Eating In

Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner and Pie

Squash dishes you’ll eat for pleasure, not duty

Winter squash—along with turkey, eggnog and perhaps your crazy aunt Bertha—reserves a place at most holiday tables. But unlike the others, there’s a seasonal reason for squash being there. And by seasonal, I don't mean the holiday season.

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V.20 No.45 | 11/10/2011
Mina Yamashita

Mina's Dish

Go Nuts

Holiday snacking with a local twist

I make spicy sugared nuts at the holidays in volumes—six to eight pounds at a time—to share with friends during the holidays. Here’s my recipe. It’s very easy, and (if you don’t eat them all first) the leftover pieces are great on salads.
V.20 No.39 | 9/29/2011
Peaches from Wagner Farms
Mina Yamashita

Mina's Dish

Just Peachy

Georgia has nothing on New Mexico peaches. Even as we near the end of the season, local growers are still offering large and succulent globes of juicy, dripping perfection. Whatever peaches are left after my daily snacks will go into quick desserts such as cobbler or—my favorite—peach upside-down cake. Here’s the recipe.
V.20 No.38 | 9/22/2011
Forage for storage
Ari LeVaux

Locovore

Abundance Issues

A happy problem for season-end basil and corn

When I want to store large amounts of basil, I don't make pesto. Instead, I prepare a bare-bones mixture of pureed basil, olive oil and salt, which I freeze in jars. If I want to make pesto at a later date I can always add pine nuts, cheese and garlic. But I can't remove those things from pesto if, in the middle of winter, I decide I want homegrown basil in my Thai coconut green curry.

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V.20 No.35 | 9/1/2011
Red tops of the crocus stigma in Iranian Sargol saffron
Mina Yamashita

Mina's Dish

Shake It Up

Don’t be afraid to blend your own spices

A good Alfredo has a kiss of nutmeg in the sauce. Masala means an amalgam of spices. Traditional Peking duck requires infusing the bird with star anise and other flavorings. What they all have in common are spices.