street art


V.19 No.44 | 11/4/2010
Poet Idris Goodwin and artist Chaz Bojorquez
516 ARTS

Festival Preview

Shout It in the Streets

516 ARTS brings the noise

It was time to see; now it’s time to listen.

STREET ARTS: A Celebration of Hip Hop Culture & Free Expression began in October with graffiti and its nerdy cousin, street art. The streets of Downtown Albuquerque—a city with a long and often acrimonious relationship with graffiti—saw artists putting up posters and murals, beautifying the scenery. 516 ARTS Executive Director Suzanne Sbarge and Program Coordinator Francesca Searer say that so far, the exhibit has opened the conversation they had hoped for.

“It could have been just a big fight,” Sbarge says. “But there has been a lot of intelligent dialoging.”

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V.19 No.39 | 9/30/2010
“Los Locos de Cali” by Chaz Bojórquez is a 10-color serigraph (silk screen print).

Arts

This Week's Arts & Lit: Bush-hated Glory Box, 24 hr Comics Day, Street Arts/renowned artist Chaz Bojórquez

Culture Shock: If George Bush, Sr., hated it, it has to be good (right?) See some of the Gay performance art hated on by Republicans with Tim Miller tonight, Sept. 30, at 7:30pm; and comics nerds stay up all night, creating a comic book in 24 hours at 24 Hour Comic Day (Sunday, Oct. 3).

Street art gets invited in for a drink and maybe a snack — “Street Arts: A Celebration of Hip Hop culture and Free Expression” keeps it real with Shepard Fairey, Chaz Bojórquez and other local, national and international heavyweights of the genre.

When graffiti artists grow up: talking with world-renowned street artist Chaz Bojórquez.

“The Great White Buffalo” by Ernest Doty. He doesn’t appreciate Purple People Eater jokes.

Gallery Preview

Outdoor Art Comes Inside

516 takes it to the streets

It can be a mural on a street corner, a piece of art pasted to a wall or a rainbow dripped down the side of a building. Sometimes it’s graffiti; other times it’s propaganda. Street art can be a legal mural painted on a wall or surreptitiously placed in the dead of night, ninja style. Banksy, a highly secretive street artist who operates out of the United Kingdom, has painted murals on the sides of cows, pigs and sheep. He placed his own work inside the Louvre in Paris (it was quickly removed).

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“Los Locos de Cali” by Chaz Bojórquez is a 10-color serigraph (silk screen print).

Arts Profile

Señor Suerte

Talking with street artist Chaz Bojórquez

Chaz Bojórquez has never been caught, but he has been chased.

He laughs when he admits it, because it seems slightly absurd: a world-renowned artist with work hanging permanently in the Smithsonian American Art Museum being pursued by cops for painting something on the side of a building. Such is the life of a graffiti artist.

Even if you don’t recognize his name, you’d probably recognize Bojórquez’ work. He’s most well-known for a skull he designed that’s referred to as Señor Suerte, which he stenciled all over Los Angeles in the ’70s and became a symbol of protection among street gangs. Bojórquez’ cholo-style-graffiti-meets-Asian-calligraphy has inspired generations of street artists and shown in galleries across the globe. It’s hard to imagine he got his start tagging a garage door.

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V.19 No.32 | 8/12/2010
Rainbow on the Anasazi building downtown.
Eric Williams ericwphoto.com

Art News

Rainbow Warrior

The Alibi speaks with Albuquerque’s most controversial public artist

Every time I get on the Rail Runner in Downtown Albuquerque, I look across the platform at a rainbow dripping down the side of a building just across Broadway. Occasionally, I hear people point it out to their friends, but it largely goes unnoticed by my fellow commuters. About a month ago, a similar rainbow appeared on the Anasazi Building at Sixth Street and Central—that’s the abandoned high-rise recently taken over by the city after developer Vincent Garcia and two others were charged with 19 counts of fraud and money laundering.

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V.19 No.31 |

News

White v Roy G Biv: The rainbow man cometh

The Alibi has just learned that Albuquerque police arrested the man they say is street artist Nese. He's been charged with vandalism in connection with several rainbows painted on Downtown buildings.

Early last month, after one of the rainbows appeared on the Anasazi building at Sixth and Central, APD began to search for the artist.

Keep an eye out for next week's Alibi. We've been investigating this art for a few weeks and just might have some surprises for you. We'll also keep following it and keep you updated as new information becomes available.

V.19 No.29 |

art

Fighting graffiti with beauty in Bangalore!

Fresh off the awesome Exit Through the Gift Shop, which I finally got around to last night, I've got street art on the brain.

First, let me just expound, briefly, on the sweetness of this movie. It was totally sweet. And this comes from someone who is tired of hearing about Shepard Fairey and hopes the AP takes him down for lying about which Obama image he culture jammed. So, when I saw Fairey come on the screen, I let out a tiny groan. But it was cool, because he turned out to be less of a tool than I thought, but not rad enough to change my mind about the guy. The flick mostly revolves around Mr. Brainwash, who is clearly, at least in some aspect, made up. Anyway, read Devin D. O'Leary's review of the movie if you want more.

I wasn't even going to bring Exit up until I saw these fantastic murals that are coving Bangalore, India. From the Telegraph, "authorities say they plan to extend the scheme to cover virtually every city wall." They're sick of graffiti and are doing something about it. Check out the elephant on roller skates, he's my favorite.

So, the point is: Street art kicks-ass, if it's art and not just some nickname you made up for yourself. If you're sporting a spray can, do something beautiful, please.

Oh, and if anyone knows who did those killer rainbows downtown, tell them I'm looking for them. It's all on the down low, of course.

V.19 No.21 | 5/27/2010
Sarah Slater

Arts

Where in Albuquerque?

Have you seen me? Where?