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V.19 No.47 |

news

The Daily Word 11.25.10: Snow!, adopt a turkey, South Korea

The Daily Word

Snow!

A bird in a bird in a bird in a pig.

Or, adopt a turkey instead of eating it.

Many police officers will be out patrolling for drunk drivers today.

I-40 re-opens after a big car smash. I-25 closed at Menaul.

There were few women at the first Thanksgiving. (So let the turkey burn. Have a beer.)

Sheriff admits to selling old body armor to military personnel, resigns.

How Obama and Palin will spend Thanksgiving.

South Korea's defense chief steps down.

Feds working to ban chemicals in herbal synthetic marijuana.

This woman was trapped for 20 days in a bathroom.

Lord Flight is sorry for saying changes to welfare would give poor people an incentive to breed.

V.19 No.45 | 11/11/2010

news

Scenes from the Lead/Coal construction mess

I’m on Yale, creeping from Silver to Coal over the course of 15 minutes. My journey began at Cornell, about a block away from my destination. But construction has routed me in a giant U, and now my car is guzzling gas while all the students and University area customers simultaneously try to use the single-laned roads.

The Morningstars put a sign in front of their store, Free Radicals, on Yale and Lead that says something to the effect of: Road destruction will continue until you buy clothes from us.

It’s late, 11:30 p.m. I tried to take Garfield heading east. I turn left onto my street, then meet a barricade. The rules have changed again. Now, you can’t cross Coal. I sit, exhausted, wondering what to do next. In my weary state, I’m wondering if there’s even a path left to get to my house. Into my headlights walks a baseball cap-wearing neighbor. He moves the barrels for me, laughs, and says he hasn’t much cared for the construction himself.

I’m getting my mail. Down the street, I see a nearby business owner on his phone, angrily moving the barrels back into place. People have been cutting across his parking lot to get onto Lead. He sits on the curb, frustrated.

I’m riding my bike to work to avoid the morning traffic inching along the too small streets; Silver and Yale are just not ready for this many drivers. On Silver, careless and impatient road warriors, so many more than usual, try to cut around me. They pass way too close. I wait to cross Yale and continue down the designated Bicycle Boulevard. It’s taking some time, as the traffic is bad. The car behind me begins to honk. Finally, I can cross. A driver patiently stops to let me through. The truck behind him honks.

I can’t be the only one driving in circles, reminiscing about the good ol’ days (a week or two ago), when things were better, simple. Lead went west, two lanes. Coal went east, two lanes. Life was good.

V.19 No.43 | 10/28/2010

news

Six red-light cameras may be going down

If the Council approves the measure, a half-dozen cameras will be taken down, and all cameras will no longer issue citations for speeding.

Say goodbye to red-light cameras at:

Academy and Wyoming

Central and Eubank

Menaul and Carlisle

Coors and Montaño

Coors and Paseo del Norte

Jefferson and Paseo del Norte

Mayor Richard Berry got the results of a study by UNM’s Institute for Social Research. The study found that those six intersections saw no reductions in crash-related costs. He’d asked them to look into the cameras’ effectiveness in March.

The study also states:

There is no proof that ticketing for speeding via camera improved safety; there were more rear-end collisions in some cases; and 30 percent of the intersections saw an increase in property damage.

On a positive note, citizens have saved more than $2 million overall in crash-related costs, injuries decreased (even though rear-end wrecks increased) and the program prevented about 120 injurious accidents.

Citizens have learned how to avoid getting tickets, too. Initially, each camera was issuing about 600 citations per month. By 2008, that number dropped to 100 per month.

If the Council approves Berry’s proposal, the city will also look for a third party to administrate the program and would have a contract ready by the end of this year. In early 2007, the city was being sued by people who argued that it had created its own court.

Berry’s doing what he said he would during last year’s campaign cycle.

V.19 No.40 |

News

Lead and Coal are going down for 18 months

One-way arteries in the university area and Nob Hill will be under construction for the next year and a half. The city's doing it for better drainage, wider sidewalks and landscaping that will impart a "more parkway feel."

Bike lanes will be preserved, says Mark Motsko, spokesperson for the Municipal Development Department. The project will extend from I-25 to Washington along Lead and Coal.

Work and closures begin at the end of October and are scheduled to be completed in the Spring of 2012. It will happen in phases. First, Coal will be shut down, and Lead will become a two-way street, says Motsko. Then, vice versa. In the meantime, cyclists will be diverted to Silver, the bike boulevard.

Mayor Richard Berry urges citizens to go to the open house and meeting today about the construction. It will be at Immanuel Presbyterian Church (114 Carlisle SE). The open house is from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., and from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. City staff will give a presentation at 6 p.m.