a christmas carol


V.26 No.51 | 12/21/2017
Scott Severance
PerSeverance Productions

Arts Interview

A Stake of Holly Through the Heart

A Christmas Carol takes the stage at Popejoy

Scott Severance, the founding artistic director and actor assuming the iconic role of Scrooge, spoke with us about the lasting resonance of A Christmas Carol.
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V.25 No.48 | 12/01/2016
John Leech

Event Horizon

Best in Snow

Thursday, Dec 8: Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol

A retelling of the classic tale from the messenger's perspective.
V.24 No.51 | 12/17/2015

Here's to Dickens

And the greatest Christmas story every told

My favorite Christmas story of all time is … A Christmas Carol. Maybe it is because I love Halloween and the story is a nice marriage of the two. Three ghosts showing up at the strike of an eerie old clock? And those children hiding under The Ghost of Christmas Future's cloak? Jesus! There's nothing scarier than taking a look at all the decisions you've made in your life and really flinching. Even the Muppets couldn't really make the story totally lighthearted. The horror of the past, the horror...

Charles Dickens was said to love a night time stroll around the gaslight illuminated streets of 19th century London. I can only imagine the spooky stories culled from those cobbled streets, how the coughs born of a grimy, coal-fired city and the figures huddled for warmth in the winding alleys might have produced the works we're familiar with today. Dickens wanted to write a political pamphlet about the social ills he saw in the city, instead, he decided to write A Christmas Carol, declaring that a bit of fiction would have much more force.

The endearing image of Scrooge, sickly old Tiny Tim and the cadre of spirits that direct the story certainly have a moral to teach that translates through the centuries.

V.20 No.49 | 12/8/2011
Photo by Aaron Giombolini

Theater

A Christmas Carol at VSA North Fourth Art Center

Blackout Theatre’s adaptation of the Charles Dickens classic pits a group of strangers in a St. Louis train station, waiting to be whisked away for the holidays. Delays ensue, and the motley group turns a bad situation into theatrics. Writer Christie Chisholm reviewed it in this week’s arts section. “Blackout’s version is marvelous,” she writes, “whimsical yet dramatic with fine acting, haunting live music and some wonderfully creative puppetry. The kids will love it, but more importantly, you will probably love it, too.” Tonight’s show is at 8 p.m. There are also performances Saturday and Sunday.