chinese food


V.22 No.43 | 10/24/2013

Music

Rooster Roundabout: This week’s music highlights

Guitar legend Carlos Santana has announced that he's going to release a new record in early 2014, and he will preview the album's material at a concert in Guadalajara, Mexico on Dec. 14. Looks like some people have some flights to book.

Uh-oh spaghettios, it's that time of year again. The time when music aficionados, nerds and enthusiasts altogether flock to local record stores to purchase limited edition pressings from your favorite bands … yes, it's Record Store Day … or at least the Black Friday edition. Some bands doing special releases include The Doors, Cheap Trick, Tegan & Sara, Roy Orbison and more. You can go to the Record Store Day website for a full list.

Punk fans rejoice! Bad Religion's Christmas Songs drops on Oct. 29, but the band has provided a little slice of the festive season by sharing their cover of “O Come, O Come Emmanuel.” Nothing says Christmas like a punk/thrash version of a Christian classic.

It wasn't enough for Kurt Vile to release what I consider to be one of the best albums of 2013, but he had to go the extra mile by releasing an EP, It's a big world out there (and I am scared), which comes out Nov. 19. Vile has given a sneak peek of the EP by making one of the tracks (“Feel My Pain”) available online. You can head over to Consequence of Sound for a listen.

Bombadil is one of those derivative folk-pop bands, but their mellifluous melodies are easy to get lost in. My favorite track off their album, Metrics of Affection, was “Born at 5:00,” and it's one of those sentimental ditties where a life is encapsulated within three to four minutes (which is no easy feat). So it's awfully appropriate the band decided to make a video for this particular track.

I don't like Billie Joe Armstrong. I like Norah Jones. I love the Everly Brothers. So upon reading that Armstrong and Jones decided to cover the Everly Brothers' Songs Our Daddy Taught Us with a series of duets, I was a little unsure of how to feel. Then I listened to their version of the track “Long Time Gone,” and my worries were immediately assuaged. Their album, Foreverly, hits stores on Nov. 25, and you can head over to Stereogum to read an interview with the artists about the record.

It seems like the Daft Punk craze is anything but dying down as the band have decided to expand on Random Access Memories by releasing a deluxe box set, which includes a 56-page booklet, robot schematics, a 70mm motion picture film strip and more. That available for shipping in early December, but it's available or preorder and runs about $275.

The Arcade Fire have been everywhere. From performing on “Saturday Night Live” to an appearance on “The Colbert Report” to playing numerous shows in preparation for their upcoming album's release (Reflektor comes out next week), they've been anything but shy about making their faces recognizable. Not that they weren't already well-known. Now they've shared the entire album via Youtube.

Paul McCartney shared a new video for the track, “Queenie Eye,” from his latest LP New, which basically shows McCartney laying the track down in a studio before a celebrity dance party ensues. Naturally Meryl Streep is the best one.

M.I.A. Isn't one to shy away from confrontation. So it's no surprise that she shared a new track (“Y.A.L.A.”), which is sort an answer to Drake's “YOLO” motto. She previewed a sample of the track last week, but now the song is available for aural consumption in its entirety. It's also going to be on her upcoming album, Matangi, which comes out Nov. 5.

I love Chinese food, and apparently so do a lot of people. Because Alison Gold's ode to Oriental cuisine has gone viral and debuted at 29 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Many know Jim James the front man of My Morning Jacket. Some know him from his work in Monsters of Folk. And some know him simply as Jim James, since his solo LP debuted in February. Now James has shared a video for album track “State of the Art (A.E.I.O.U.),” which you can view below.

V.21 No.23 | 6/7/2012
Scapes on the plain
Ari LeVaux

Food

Scapes on a train

No, not snakes on a plane. Scapes on a train—or more specifically, garlic stalks stir-fried with pork and oyster sauce in the dining car of a Chinese train bound for Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. In this week’s Food Section, globetrotting food critic Ari LeVaux talks about the pulse-quickening moment he first encountered garlic flowers and stalks—collectively called scapes. Scapes are in season right now, and preparing them at home is inexpensive and easy. (Unlike some of the other international train rides Ari has taken.)

Food for Thought

Great Scapes

The loveliness of garlic flowers

The first time I ate garlic flowers was for breakfast on a train from Beijing to Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. The dining car didn't have a menu: You just sat down and they brought you food. A server delivered a plate of stir-fried chopped green things with pork and oyster sauce, along with a bowl of rice. It was years before that I realized that the pencil-thick green things were pieces of garlic flowers and flower stalks, collectively known as scapes.
V.20 No.33 | 8/18/2011
Mina Yamashita

Mina's Dish

Chow Dynasty

Stalwart Asian bistro is reborn in Nob Hill

Fan Tang

Chow’s Chinese Bistro opened in Santa Fe in 1993. I remember a friend telling me about a great new Chinese place I should try, and I did. The food was a step up from ordinary—fresh, bright flavors, and ingredients beyond mix-and-match vegetables. In 1999, the first Albuquerque Chow’s opened on Juan Tabo, followed by another at Cottonwood mall in 2005. Proprietors Richard and Lucy Zeng and their son Jason opened Fan Tang two weeks ago in Nob Hill.

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V.20 No.10 | 3/10/2011
Chinese dumplings
Sergio Salvador salvadorphoto.com

Restaurant Review

AmerAsia & Sumo Sushi

You say Confucius, I say Zen

Sometimes it freaks me out when Chinese restaurants serve sushi. Japanese food is light and neat, leaving nothing to chance. Prepared with short, meticulous strokes, sushi is the epitome of this culinary ethos. Meanwhile, Chinese food is created with broad, heavy, greasy strokes, unafraid of the chaos of a stir-fry. The two foods don’t belong together, and it often seems like they only end up on menus that are cynically aimed at ignorant Americans who think all Asian food is the same.
V.20 No.7 | 2/17/2011
Sautéed scallops and shrimp on a bed of hot wakame tea salad, topped with crispy fried shallots
Mina Yamashita

Mina's Dish

Cooking With Tea

Brew a world of flavor from this versatile plant

Tea has had multiple applications for centuries—but only recently by Westerners—as an exciting component in Asian cooking: to infuse flavors into meats, jazz up marinades and sauces, and to create broths and garnishes. Here, food writer Mina Yamashita shares one of her favorite recipes.