ecology


V.25 No.26 | 06/30/2016
Pixabay

Event Horizon

Water Under the Bridge

Saturday, Jul 9: Centennial Nights: A River Thirsting for Itself

Learn about the history of water, agriculture, environment and politics surrounding the Rio Grande.
V.25 No.1 | 01/07/2016

News

The Daily Word in REAL ID, Bosque Trails and dinosaur lovin'

The Daily Word

The REAL ID can got kicked further down the street, at least for airports.

The city is asking for comment on where the new trail should run. If and how wide are already decided, so stifle those complaints.

New Mexico's less shitty teen pregnancy rate isn't reflected in rural communities.

Insurance companies failing to pay the Department of Health for vaccines has doctors turning away patients.

An Oklahoma company is pushing for a zoning exemption to begin drilling for oil in Rio Rancho.

Arizona and the US Department of the Interior are making plans for a diversion of the Gila river that threatens its ecology.

Babe I love you, but I'm a T-Rex

V.24 No.53 | 12/31/2015
morguefile.com

Event Horizon

Winter's Feather Forecast

Saturday, Jan 9: Winter Bird and Bat Festival

A speaker program, guided bird and plant walks, live birds with Wildlife Rescue and others, and crafts for kids.
V.24 No.17 | 4/23/2015

Feature

The Lazy Person’s Guide to Saving the World

We can’t all be Captain Planet, but even couch potatoes can do their part.
V.24 No.14 | 4/2/2015
Timelessness Machine
[click to enlarge]
all works by Julie Suzanne Brokken

Arts Feature

This Life Is But a Dream, or a Magic Show

The harmonious art, poetry and photography of Julie Suzanne Brokken

Julie Suzanne Brokken’s art juxtaposes fanciful elements—everything from Rio Grande river water to encaustic wax—in uncanny ways.
View in Alibi calendar calendar
V.23 No.50 | 12/11/2014

Arts Feature

A Long-Lost Field Guide for the Soul

Rediscover an ecstatic, mystic book of nature writing

How a slender volume unearthed by Terry Tempest and Brooke Williams in a dusty bookstore became the antidote to “a poverty of the soul.”
View in Alibi calendar calendar
V.22 No.25 | 6/20/2013
Springs underwater and the coral reefs that live near them sustain other species.
Elizabeth Crook

Science

The Kinda Good News About Coral Peril

¡Viva la Science!

Rising carbon dioxide levels— and oh boy, do we haz them—lead to lower pH in our oceans. The lower the pH, the more acidic the water. Coral reefs, underwater structures notoriously unwilling to relocate, are stuck dealing with the result. A new paper shows that coral reefs that have been exposed to acidic waters are less dense and more fragile.

Marine scientist and paper co-author Adina Paytan points out that it could’ve been worse. “The good news is that they don't just die,” she says, in what one can only imagine to be a hollowly perky tone of voice. “They are able to grow and calcify, but they are not producing robust structures.”

Fortunately, what she’s not saying is that the whole wide world of coral has gone rickety. Scientists, being scientists, work hard to gather data that lets them make predictions about what will happen. In this case, the study focused on coral located near underwater springs off of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, where the ocean water becomes naturally more acidic.

Because, though they can simulate conditions in a laboratory, scientists can’t be deliberately acidifying coral environments in the wild, now can they? By looking at a place where coral is already surviving in conditions of higher acidity, the paper’s authors found a site “where nature is already doing the experiments for us,” explains Don Rice, program director in the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Division of Ocean Sciences.

For Paytan, the results mix not-terrible news with a concise course of action. "We need to protect corals from other stressors, such as pollution and overfishing. If we can control those, the impact of ocean acidification might not be as bad."

Source: nsf.gov