french cuisine


V.23 No.32 | 8/7/2014
Helen Mirren for Viagra

Film Review

The Hundred-Foot Journey

Exotic foodie romance comes with the Oprah stamp of approval

Steven Spielberg and Oprah Winfrey get togther for food and romance in The Hundred-Foot Journey.
V.19 No.26 | 7/1/2010
P’tit Louis Bistro presides over the corner of Third Street and Gold.
Mina Yamashita

Mina's Dish

Go Where You Are Welcome

P’tit Louis Bistro

Google “bistro albuquerque,” and you’ll find more than a dozen restaurants that serve French, Asian, Chinese, Italian and contemporary cuisine. Figuring out what they have in common is a challenge. The word “bistro” has a fuzzy etymology. Some attribute it to the presence of Russian Cossacks in 1815 Paris who used the term bystro (quickly). Some linguists say the word didn’t enter the lexicon until the end of the 18th century. Wikipedia notes that bistros may have evolved when landlords, who offered room and board, expanded their kitchens by setting up sidewalk tables for the public. They served homey food—braised stews, simple meals and a house wine.

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V.19 No.15 | 4/15/2010
Rule No. 1: When in Paris, do not attempt to eat anything labeled “Southwestern,” “Mexican” or “Tex-Mex.” Do get your snacks from a typical café/bistro, like the one pictured here.
Ari LeVaux

Have Fork, Will Travel

Le Nouveaux Mexique

A Duke City food critic in the land of milk and butter

An Albuquerquean foodie visiting Paris for the first time could find himself justifiably intimidated by the city’s fabled cuisine. If that’s you, I suggest you begin with a visit to one of the many restaurants in Paris that belong to the chain called “Indiana Café.”

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V.19 No.14 | 4/8/2010

[click to enlarge]
Dimitri Staub

Have Fork, Will Travel

Le Fooding

France’s new generation of eaters

On a recent Wednesday evening, a youngish crowd gathered on the banks of Paris' Seine River to catch a ride to a nearby island. After the short crossing, they sat on blankets and pillows amid crackling fire pits and ate Irish tapas. There were plates of salad greens tossed with Clonakilty blood sausage, thick with oats. Bowls of chunky seafood chowder with smoked salmon were followed by creamy mocha hazelnut meringue—all of which helped absorb a variety of whiskey-based drinks, including whiskey Mojitos. Folksy rock bands played on a makeshift stage, not loud enough to overwhelm conversation. The event was called Foodstock. And while most of the guests were better dressed and better smelling than attendees at the namesake Woodstock festival 41 years ago, both groups shared a spirit of revolution.

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