lead and coal


V.21 No.19 | 5/10/2012
Son and father: Luis and Francisco Rodriguez
Sam Adams

Arts Profile

Breaking the Mold

Inexpensive custom creations have kept Casa de Piñatas a UNM-area staple for 16 years

In 1996, Francisco Rodriguez opened a little store at the intersection of Lead and Yale with his wife, Patty. Rodriguez handled the crafting, and his wife managed the business side. It's at that same location, 16 years later, that Rodriguez and his son continue the tradition of custom piñatas.
V.20 No.47 |

news

The Daily Word in Egypt, UFOs and free rides

The Daily Word

Turkey-shapes-made-from-other-food competition. David Byrne entered two.

Tavern Taxi will drive you home for free this weekend if you've had a few drinks. Good for anywhere in Bernalillo County. 999-1400.

Black Friday shopping rage.

Businesses struggle on Lead, and road construction through the holiday season could mean local shops won't survive.

More UFO sightings in New Mexico than usual.

Worst movies ever.

Since the Republicans don't want him, ex-Gov. Gary Johnson might go Libertarian.

Sandiago's Mexican Grill cooks up a Thanksgiving feast for foster kids and their families.

Egyptians protest the military regime.

Journalist talks about her assault in Egypt by riot police.

The world's first full face transplant.

The rogue ad man behind Buy Nothing Day and the Occupy movement.

Changes to the Catholic mass.

Famous people who died in 2011.

V.20 No.8 | 2/24/2011
Fatima Tannagda
Sam Adams

Traffic

Roads Less Traveled

Shops near Yale falter, but construction marches on

Things just went from bad to worse for small business owners in the area of the city's $26.5 million Lead and Coal renovation. On Monday, Feb. 21, the city blocked off Yale between Lead and Avenida César Chávez to rehab a storm drain system.

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V.19 No.40 |

News

Lead and Coal are going down for 18 months

One-way arteries in the university area and Nob Hill will be under construction for the next year and a half. The city's doing it for better drainage, wider sidewalks and landscaping that will impart a "more parkway feel."

Bike lanes will be preserved, says Mark Motsko, spokesperson for the Municipal Development Department. The project will extend from I-25 to Washington along Lead and Coal.

Work and closures begin at the end of October and are scheduled to be completed in the Spring of 2012. It will happen in phases. First, Coal will be shut down, and Lead will become a two-way street, says Motsko. Then, vice versa. In the meantime, cyclists will be diverted to Silver, the bike boulevard.

Mayor Richard Berry urges citizens to go to the open house and meeting today about the construction. It will be at Immanuel Presbyterian Church (114 Carlisle SE). The open house is from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., and from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. City staff will give a presentation at 6 p.m.