Movie Reviews

Read up, before you pay $5 for a bucket of popcorn.


V.27 No.38 | 9/20/2018
We the Animals

Film Review

We The Animals

Coming-of-age drama paints impressionistic portrait of preteen life

We the Animals speaks to both the resiliency and the impressionability of youth, with raw performances from the actors and symbol-laden cinematography that weaves a primal world of earth, water, leaves and rain.
V.27 No.37 | 9/13/2018
“… And I say 102 Dalmatians is the best Glenn Close performance to date!”

Film Review

The Wife

The family that writes together fights together in A-list acting display

They say that, “behind every great man there is a great woman.” That axiom gets taken apart like a Swiss watch and examined under the loupe in the high-class literary drama/handcrafted Oscar bait The Wife.
V.27 No.36 | 9/6/2018
Madeline's Madeline

Film Review

Madeline’s Madeline

Teenage girl is having an art attack in theatrical indie

We’re all actors, Madeline's Madeline seems to imply, acting as ourselves.
V.27 No.35 | 8/30/2018
Far From the Tree

Film Review

Far From the Tree

Documentary addresses the difficulty of “different” families

How do families deal with children who are very different from them? That’s the probing premise behind Rachel Dretzin’s honest and empathetic documentary Far From the Tree.
V.27 No.34 | 8/23/2018
Papillon

Film Review

Papillon

New take on famed French tale of prison life can’t escape the past

Despite the inadvisability of taking another run at 1973’s highly regarded, Academy Award-nominated Papillon, someone has gone and done just that.

V.27 No.33 | 8/16/2018
Never Goin' Back

Film Review

Never Goin’ Back

Teenage stoner comedy lets the ladies do the dirty work for a change

Whether you find Never Goin’ Back a hilarious tribute to the wild shenanigans of youth or a depressing wake-up call about the horrors of the Millennial Generation may depend largely on your age group.
V.27 No.32 | 8/9/2018
Who’s hungry for seafood?

Film Review

The Meg

Wait 20 minutes after eating to view this movie

The Meg is nature disaster monster movie fare at its biggest, loudest and silliest.

V.27 No.31 | 8/2/2018
Eighth Grade

Film Review

Eighth Grade

Bo Burnham studies tweenage angst in writing-directing debut

Hilarious and painful and perfectly well-observed, Eighth Grade takes the tired “coming-of-age” indie dramedy genre and refreshes it for the iPhone age.
V.27 No.30 | 7/26/2018
Don't Worry, He Won't Get Far On Foot

Film Review

Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far On Foot

True-life tale of alcoholism and cartoons is unexpectedly uplifting

Don't Worry, He Won't Get Far On Foot is a disarmingly empathetic biopic that surprises with its sincerity and its down-to-earth charm.
V.27 No.29 | 7/19/2018
Sorry to Bother You

Film Review

Sorry To Bother You

Upward mobility gets weird in off-kilter comedy

Sorry to Bother You is not the work of a practiced, disciplined filmmaker. It’s the work of a manic, committed, wildly creative first-timer.
V.27 No.28 | 7/12/2018
Eating Animals

Film Review

Eating Animals

Farming documentary hopes to influence food choices

Eating Animals spends its time talking about sustainable alternative solutions to factory farms, giving in to neither hardcore carnivores nor militant animal lovers.
V.27 No.26 | 6/28/2018
The Great Silence
Courtesy of Film Movement

Film Review

The Great Silence

Classic Italian Western is restored to its cold, dark glory

Sergio Corbucci's 1968 masterpiece The Great Silence has been digitally restored for its 50th anniversary and it's brutal, uncompromising and visually sweeping.
V.27 No.25 | 6/21/2018
It’s not truly a “heist” until disguises are involved.
Courtesy of The Orchard

Film Review

American Animals

Genre-bending crime thriller incorporates documentary techniques in its true(?)-life narrative

American Animals intercuts interview footage of the real-life people behind the story with scripted scenes of the actors portraying them, but subverts the docudrama trappings.
V.27 No.24 | 6/14/2018
Yup, those are mountains, all right.
Greenwich Entertainment

Film Review

Mountain

This mountain is certainly high, but not very deep

Australian writer-director Jennifer Peedom’s rather bluntly titled Mountain could have easily expanded its title to Mountains: What Are They, and Why Are They So Popular?
V.27 No.22 | 5/31/2018
Solo: A Star Wars Story

Film Review

Solo: A Star Wars Story

The now-divisive franchise has fun with a propulsive prequel

Solo: A Star Wars Story, isn’t (and can’t be) all things to all people, but does just about everything it conceivably can to earn the praise of moviegoers.