napkin art


V.18 No.50 | 12/10/2009

Napkin Art #36: “Dear Jessica, This Is What You Would Look Like Without Skin’” by Brian

This week’s Napkin Gem came along with a note: “Nick – Brian drew this napkin art for me this week. Use it if you want. – Jessica.”

I hate to nitpick but that’s actually what she would look like without skin, guts, blood and eyeballs but with a Farrah wig.

Thanks, Brian!

Napkin Art #35: “Carl No. 2 ‘Okay Beer’” by Judson Frondorf

This week we have another Celebrity Napkin Art from Judson Frondorf, long-time Albuquerque musician/performance artist and former singer for the legendary Cracks in the Sidewalk. Holy Partains! “Did you see the drummer’s hair?” Thanks, Jud!

Napkin Art #34: “Teeth Rotting and Falling Out While a Bear Mocks Me” by Robert Masterson

Robert Masterson, noted author of Artificial Rats and Electric Cats, former editor of the Westchester Weekly, and frequent Alibi contributor, submitted this Napkin Creation inspired by his swirling subconscious mind. His real life is even weirder. Thanks, buddy!

Napkin Art #33: Napkin Art at Monroe’s!

Monroe’s was voted as having Albuquerque’s best red chile cheeseburger in Alibi’s Best of Burque 2008. The other thing you need to know is that the 1520 Lomas NW location has a whole wall of Napkin Art. The third thing you need to know is that I don’t know who did all that Napkin Art, but it looks like it’s all by the same guy. The fourth thing you need to know is that the rest of the food, besides just the red chile cheeseburger, is pretty good. The fifth thing you need to know is that I went there for lunch about a month ago, which is when I got this picture. The sixth thing you need to know is that I got a new dog. The seventh thing you need to know is don’t click here.

V.18 No.49 | 12/3/2009
The whole picture, sideways

Napkin Art #32: “Exquisite Corpse” by Misty and Anonymous

Misty presented this Napkin Collaboration to me, but her co-artist didn’t identify herself. I asked the anonymous artist if she would like to sign her work, but she just looked at me until I became uncomfortable.

“Or,” I suggested, “you could just say ‘buzz off, asshole.’”

“Are you calling me an asshole?” she asked.

“No, I was just pretending to be you calling me an asshole.”

She looked at me for a minute with sort of a stern expression, then folded the napkin into my pocket and turned away. It was a great time. Thanks, you guys!

V.18 No.44 | 10/29/2009

Napkin Art #31: “Dia de los Skeletor” by Lisa Lorenzo

Lisa Lorenzo’s “Dia de los Skeletor” cleverly mingles imagery from traditional Mexican Folk Art with the skull-like face that hovers over my bed at night. What does it want? What does want? What does it want? Lisa’s Napkin Art asks these questions and many more as her skull/teacher beams through the darkness with unholy, smoldering light. Thanks, Lisa!

Napkin Art #30: “Dahlia” by Jessica Zinc

As the petals of a flower, so are the many mighty and girly ways of Napkin Art. Here, Jessica Zinc created her Napkin through the same meticulous process God used when he created the first flower. This awesome process is sometimes called a “prawesomecess.” Thanks, Jessica!

Napkin Art #29: “Grandma” by Jerry L. Bustamante Sr.

As promised a few weeks ago, here’s “Grandma,” a second offering from the very talented Jerry L. Bustamante Sr. The subtle shading and emotional ambiguity of Bustamante’s works truly put them in a class of their own. Thank you, Jerry!

Napkin Art #28: “Eye” by Heiko Vick

Heiko Vick, our very first Napkin Art contributor, returns this week with “Eye.” Heiko’s distinctive style is immediately recognizable both for its detail and its freedom – two seemingly opposite aspects that actually enhance each other through sythesis. Creepy eye, Heiko! Thank you!

Napkin Art #27: “Top Hat” by Nancy Brackett

Strong, aggressive lines and a sense of teetering motion characterize Nancy Brackett’s Napkin Art masterpiece, “Top Hat.” Proportion and perspective cross visual swords in a battle for the eye’s attention, as the figure (a mockery of the Monopoly Man!) bursts free of one frame only to be trapped by another. Brackett has created an enduring symbol of American Wealth wistfully hoisted by its own petard. Also, it looks like I folded it, which is a shame. Thanks, Nancy!

Strong, aggressive lines and a sense of teetering motion characterize Nancy Brackett’s Napkin Art masterpiece, “Top Hat.” Proportion and perspective cross visual swords in a battle for the eye’s attention, as the figure (a mockery of the Monopoly Man!) bursts free of one frame only to be trapped by another. Brackett has created an enduring symbol of American Wealth wistfully hoisted by its own petard. Also, it looks like I folded it, which is a shame. Thanks, Nancy!

V.18 No.42 | 10/15/2009

Napkin Art #26: “Sombrero” by Jerry L. Bustamante Sr.

Mr. Bustamante dropped this and another piece of Napkin Art off at the front desk last week. Look at the shading; he definitely puts a high degree of care into his work. I’m going to save his other piece for future posting; it’s of the same high quality as “Sombrero.” Thanks, Jerry!

Napkin Art #25: “Shack it like a Belly Dancer” by Layla

Everyone loves a belly dancer, so this piece of Napkin Art featuring a belly dancer will most assuredly please everyone. Shack that thing! Thanks, Layla!

V.18 No.40 | 10/1/2009

Napkin Art #24: “Carl, would you like a hot dog?” by Jessica Cassyle Carr

Halloween came early this year when our own JCC submitted this piece of Napkin Art inviting our corpulent publisher to taste his own untimely doom. Go ahead, Carl. Have a hotdog and let us drain the tallow from your lifeless, flapping jowls. Plus, we all want raises.

V.18 No.39 | 9/24/2009

Napkin Art #23: Pagoda!! Sunrise!! by Isaiah (Smith?)

Here’s a second submission by a previous napkin artist, Isaiah (whose last name I’m reading to be “Smith,” though I trust he’ll forgive me if I’m mistaken). The mountaintops have a certain feathery depth, but the L-shaped rays of the sun, to my sensibilities, create the truly authentic feel of this Asian landscape. Isaiah has requested his work be returned, so all serious art collectors must deal with him personally. Thanks, Isaiah!