painting


V.28 No.17 | 4/25/2019
(De)Colonized Ewok
Ryan Singer

Arts Interview

Inspiration, Context and Myth

Ryan Singer’s Childhood Mythologies

The future may be as bright as his pallet for painter Ryan Singer, but the mythologies in his work can be recognized from a past not so long ago, from a place not so far away.
V.28 No.11 | 3/14/2019
Andrew Fearnside in studio with new paintings at Harwood Art Center
Photo by Clarke Condé

Arts Interview

Portrait of a Creative Community

Forever Now: New Portraits by Andrew Fearnside

Weekly Alibi sat down with visual artist Andrew Fearnside to talk about community and what drives his interest in bringing community into his work.
V.28 No.10 | 3/7/2019
Póla López
courtesy of the artist

Culture Shock

La López Returns

Famed Chicana painter Póla López is back for Qué Chola exhibit

Born and raised in Las Vegas, N.M., Póla López nows lives in Los Angeles and is one of the best-loved painters in contemporary Chicanx art. She’s back in New Mexico this week, as one of her pieces is being featured in the Qué Chola exhibit at the National Hispanic Cultural Center.
V.28 No.9 | 2/28/2019
Vicente Telles
courtesy of the artist

Culture Shock

The Secret Painter

Vicente Telles grapples with growing fame

When you call Vicente Telles an artist, he seems surprised that anyone would place this word upon him, even though he makes a good living doing nothing but painting.
V.27 No.33 | 8/16/2018
Tracy Rocca works in her Albuquerque studio
Courtesy of Tracy Rocca

Culture Shock

Light as Air

Tracy Rocca works to translate experience into canvas

Tracy Rocca starts with rough renderings of national parks and slowly blurs them through layer after layer of paint, until just the washed, melding fields of color remain.
V.27 No.17 | 4/26/2018
Tammy Garcia
Wiz Allred of Desert Moon

Culture Shock

Stories in Clay and Canvas

A legacy of creativity is illustrated in Three Generations

Tammy Garcia's works on canvas are inspired by the pottery she and her family have been making for generations.
V.26 No.3 | 1/19/2017
please wipe your goddamned feet
Chad Danger Lindsay

Culture Shock

Painting Soul into the City

Sign painter Chad Lindsay dusts off an ever vibrant art

Starting with hot rod pinstriping, Chad "Danger" Lindsay developed the methodical focus and technical detail needed for sign painting.
V.25 No.35 | 09/01/2016

The Daily Word in Art, ISIS and the iPhone 7

The Daily Word

This artist has been known for documenting her interactions with strangers since the late '90s. Presently, she continues to meet people and photograph them in a way that's intimate, bold and strange.

The trial for the “Oregon Occupiers” officially begins today.

How could Apple possibly inconvenience people more than when they changed their charger?

Google is making it a priority to stop people from joining ISIS on their watch.

Mexico's finance minister has resigned for literally no reason.

Artist Alina Kunitsyna expresses her fascination with peoples' interpersonal lives in a very unique way.

V.25 No.32 | 08/11/2016
Robert Maestas

Event Horizon

Movie Master Mash-Up

Friday, Aug 19: Tarantino vs Kubrick Opening

Over 30 local artists show work inspired by the films of Quentin Tarantino and Stanley Kubrick.
V.25 No.24 | 06/16/2016

Rhapsody in Burque

Meaning in the Mundane

A stroll through the lively Nob Hill district is a reminder that the stunning artistry and energetic walls create a little haven of color and originality somewhere you might not expect.
V.25 No.10 | 03/10/2016

Arts

Finding a Contemporary Voice

The Legacy of Lloyd Kiva New and IAIA

Taking a Fritz Scholder group portrait of IAIA faculty and the legacy of the institution's first artistic director, Lloyd Kiva New, as starting points, Finding a Contemporary Voice: The Legacy of Lloyd Kiva New and IAIA includes work from the New Mexico Museum of Art's collection by IAIA faculty and alumni from the 1960s to the present such as Scholder, Neil Parsons, T.C. Cannon, Melanie Yazzie, Hulleah Tsinhnahjinnie and Will Wilson. The exhibition opens Saturday, May 21, 2016 and runs through Oct. 10, 2016. The Museum of Art's free to the public exhibition opening is on Friday, May 20 from 5.30 to 7.30pm.

Finding a Contemporary Voice complements concurrent exhibitions at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (A New Century: The Life and Legacy of Cherokee Artist and Educator Lloyd "Kiva" New) and the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Art Lloyd Kiva New: Art, Design, and Influence. All three exhibitions and associated symposia, lectures and other events celebrate the centennial of Native American artist Lloyd Kiva New's birth by focusing on key aspects of his significant contributions to contemporary Native culture.

New (Cherokee, 1916-2002) encouraged looking at innovative techniques and forms as a path to creating contemporary indigenous art. IAIA's founding in 1962 intersects with a significant moment in the history of western art when ethnicity and culture, political ideology, feminism, and the inclusion of personal narratives became legitimate forms of expression in mainstream contemporary art. IAIA's early years were also an era of consciousness raising and civil rights movements in the United States. Native American self-determination was a major issue for many indigenous artists.

Enough time has passed that the early days of IAIA, looking back half a century now, can be historicized and examined in greater context. The institution was founded during a period of great change and spurred shifts in how indigenous artists viewed themselves and their art, paving the way for Native American artists to take their place in the global contemporary art field. Looking at the issues of identity still being raised in contemporary Native American art, it is clear that the artwork of the 1960s and 70s began a conversation that continues to this day.

V.25 No.9 | 03/03/2016

Arts

Local Artist in Residence Open Studio + Talk

Heidi Brandow discusses her work

Heidi Brandow, Museum of Contemporary Native Art's current Local Artist In Residence, will give a talk at 12noon, her studio will be open to the public from 12 - 4 p.m. Brandow is a Santa Fe painter and printmaker whose work is commonly filled with whimsical characters and monsters that are often combined with words of poetry, stories, and personal reflections. Drawing her inspiration from everyday life, Brandow's work concerns discovering, defining, and redefining personal identity by questioning authority and deconstructing mainstream assumptions of Native American identity. A graduate of the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe. Brandow also studied design at the Harvard Graduate School of Design in Cambridge, MA and Istanbul Technical University in Istanbul, Turkey.

V.24 No.26 | 6/25/2015

news

The Daily Word: in Tiny Giants

The Daily Word

bro, you got goldfish in my resin, bro! you got resin in my goldfish!

from pulp to paint, the future melts.

I still hate flying.

don’t think.

i get it. the world sucks.

tiny giants made of tinier giants.

insert skynet reference here.

you dance like a windmill.

smart is simple

brevity truly is the soul of wit.

art is simply a projection.

V.24 No.19 | 5/7/2015
"This whole place is like a shrine," says Carla Ward, widow of artist Ross Ward.
All photos by J. Grisham

Arts Feature

Quirky Doesn’t Begin to Cover It

Ross Ward’s Tinkertown is really, truly art

A dazzled Joshua Lee explains why the Tinkertown Museum is “more than just a pit stop on the Turquoise Trail.”
View in Alibi calendar calendar
V.24 No.14 | 4/2/2015
Timelessness Machine
[click to enlarge]
all works by Julie Suzanne Brokken

Arts Feature

This Life Is But a Dream, or a Magic Show

The harmonious art, poetry and photography of Julie Suzanne Brokken

Julie Suzanne Brokken’s art juxtaposes fanciful elements—everything from Rio Grande river water to encaustic wax—in uncanny ways.
View in Alibi calendar calendar