skin care


V.24 No.3 |

news

The Daily Word in how to do literally everything, APD and Lars von Trier

The Daily Word

We want to teach you how to do everything. Our first effort toward that lofty goal is the first installment of our How to Do Literally Everything issue.

Amelia Olson drops mad skin care kitchen science.

M. Brianna Stallings proposes strategies for surviving ABQ Ride.

Eva Avenue hips you to how to score work as an extra.

Carrie Murphy, a local doula, shares her guidance in creating your birth plan.

Mark Lopez teaches you how to make mixed media masterpieces.

And I want to show you how to fall in love with music again.

Test your knowledge of an APD shooting that made international headlines with this week's Crib Notes.

In other Alibi-related news, contributing writer David Correia was interviewed by website The Real News Network about the struggle against police brutality in Albuquerque. Read more on the subject in his Alibi articles "Is There Justice For James Boyd?" and "Life and Death and APD: Albuquerque's police violence problem."

"Chaos reigns."

But both the theatrical and extended cuts of Lars von Trier's Nymphomaniac Volumes I and II are streaming on Netflix. Plus Antichrist and Melancholia. Not convinced? Scope our reviews of Nymphomaniac Volume I and II and Melancholia. Now take your antidepressants and screen some film.

Download OTD = London-based label Blackest Ever Black's latest show on Berlin Community Radio

V.18 No.50 | 12/10/2009
Vicious Creature, The Vanity Makeup Studio
Eric Williams

Feature

Downtown

Off Central between First and Sixth Streets

Microwave

Microwave owner Ray Chavez has skateboarding in his blood.

His grandparents opened the South Valley's Concrete Wave in 1988 (it's still there). Ray, whose feet were already glued to a deck, started working the counter when he was 9 or 10 year old. "Back then, there wasn't a lot of shops. There was the mall, and that stuff was overpriced," he says. "That's why this is the Microwave. It's the little one."

Chavez' three-year-old satellite store is, in fact, very small. But it's filled with all the right gear. "Even if we had the room, I wouldn't carry anyone besides the brands we do. They're good people with quality products. And quality products is probably the main thing in skateboarding—that's what we look for." Chavez’ is one of only a few stores in town to carry SBs—Nike's chunky, colorful, tricked-out skateboard shoe line that's sought after by "sneaker head" collectors and straight-up skaters alike ("pro" boat-style shoes run around $70, high tops jog up to $200). And since he was the first SB account in Albuquerque, he gets hooked up with a constantly changing selection of special and limited edition shoes.

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