the replacements


V.21 No.4 | 1/26/2012
The men, the myth, the not-appearing-in-this-film guys

Film Review

Color Me Obsessed: A Film About The Replacements

Music doc turns to fans for insider info on indie band

In his first documentary, Friends (With Benefits) writer and director Gorman Bechard takes viewers through a chronological history of Minneapolis/St. Paul-based The Replacements, a post-punk quartet that once made a big splash in a small pond. Banding together in 1979, the pioneering alternative rockers lasted through the following decade almost despite themselves. Color Me Obsessed: A Film About the Replacements takes us on a trip down this musical backroad with the friends and fans who love them still serving as tour guides.

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V.19 No.11 |

music

R.I.P. Alex Chilton

This week my friends in New Orleans and friends of rock and roll around the world are mourning for Alex Chilton. The musician, who had lived in New Orleans since the early '80s, died there on Wednesday of what was likely a heart attack. He was 59. Chilton first caught fame at 16 when his Memphis band The Box Tops had a hit with "The Letter." In the '70s he fronted Big Star, an endearing power-pop band that never achieved commercial success, but gained a cult following that grew exponentially over the years due in part to songs like "September Gurls," "Thirteen" and "The Ballad of El Goodo." In the '80s, he was immortalized in The Replacements' tribute track "Alex Chilton" on which Paul Westerberg sings "Children by the millions/sing for Alex Chilton/when he comes ’round/They sing, ‘I’m in love/What’s that song?/I’m in love with that song. In addition to a solo career and ongoing work with Big Star, Chilton was a producer who worked with bands like The Cramps and The Gories.

Goodbye Alex Chilton, and thank you for all of your beautiful songs.