Alibi V.29 No.36 • Sept 3-9, 2020

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Michigan

Odds and Ends

Last week Detroit emergency workers declared a woman dead and placed her in a body bag. Three hours later a staff member at a funeral home discovered she was still alive. According to ABC News Timesha Beauchamp, who was born with cerebral palsy, was placed in critical care on a respirator at Sinai-Grace Hospital in Detroit last week after being declared dead by medical professionals. Earlier in the day, Beauchamp’s family had noticed that her lips were pale, she had secretions around her mouth, and she was having trouble breathing. They immediately called 911 and firefighters rushed to the scene. The Southfield Fire Department released a statement on the incident, saying, “A local emergency department physician pronounced the patient deceased based upon medical information provided by the Southfield Fire Department at the scene. … The Southfield Fire and Police Departments followed all appropriate city, county and state protocols and procedures in this case. The City of Southfield is currently conducting a thorough internal investigation in addition to the Oakland County Medical Control Authority.” Beauchamp’s godmother told reporters that she felt a faint pulse and informed emergency responders but was told that the movements were involuntary and related to the drugs that had been administered. The mistake wasn’t discovered until an employee at the funeral home where Beauchamp was sent unzipped the body bag. “When the body bag was opened and they were getting ready to embalm the body, Timesha's eyes were open and she was breathing,” said the family’s lawyer. The four firefighters who responded to the incident have been placed on administrative leave while an investigation is conducted.

Dateline: Illinois

A Chicago restaurant is offering the most expensive peanut butter and jelly sandwich in the world for $350. According to Robb Report a new eatery is serving the pricey sandwich with a chuckle as a nod to the restaurant’s own name, PB&J—which stands for pizza, beer and jukebox. Brothers Matthew and Josh McCahill—the restaurant’s co-owners—say they invented the sandwich to attract attention to PB&J. The “Golden Goose” sandwich is made using a loaf of bread, gold dust and edible gold leaf. “The gold leaf bread loaf I researched and improved by making gold nuggets out of gold dust and sea-salt,” Matthew McCahill told reporters. It also incorporates Adams All-Natural peanut butter and a high-end jam made by French company Maison Dutriez. The tall sandwich is drizzled with manuka honey from New Zealand—known to be one of the rarest and most sought after honeys in the world. The brothers say they got the idea to invent the “Golden Goose” after discovering a $200 peanut butter and jelly sandwich that was served traditionally but featured a gold toothpick. PB&J diners who are looking for a more inexpensive option can order a regular peanut butter and jelly sandwich for $5.

Dateline: Louisiana

Last week, Hurricane Laura knocked over a Confederate statue that Calcasieu Parish leaders recently voted to keep in place. NPR reports that two weeks ago, the Calcasieu Parish Police Jury voted to keep the South's Defenders Memorial Monument in place at the parish courthouse in Lake Charles, La. despite community outcry over its positive portrayal of Confederate soldiers—including protests voiced by Lake Charles Mayor Nic Hunter. The parish said that 878 of 945 collected citizen comments were in favor of leaving the statue of a young Confederate soldier where it was. But the destructive force of Hurricane Laura put an end to the controversy last week when it knocked the statue off its pedestal—where it stood for over 100 years. Laura was a Category 4 storm with over 150 mph winds when it made landfall last week. It damaged or destroyed a number of Lake Charles landmarks, including a bowling alley, a casino and a donut shop.

Dateline: Connecticut

A Connecticut town has named its sewer plant after television personality John Oliver. USA Today reports that the comedian made fun of Danbury, Conn. last month on his HBO show when he threatened the entire town. “I know exactly three things about Danbury,” Oliver said. “USA Today ranked it the second-best city to live in in 2015, it was once the center of the American hat industry, and if you’re from there you have a standing invite to come get a thrashing from John Oliver—children included.” In response to the expletive-laden monologue, Danbury Mayor Mark Boughton posted a video on Facebook featuring himself standing in front of the city’s Wastewater Treatment Plant. “We are going to rename it the John Oliver Memorial Sewer Plant,” the mayor said. “Why? Because it's full of [expletive] just like you, John.” The city has not actually named the waste plant after Oliver, however. Boughton told reporters that the video was a “tongue-in-cheek … joke to return volley” at the comedian. “I will defend Danbury's honor, whatever the cost,” the mayor said.

Compiled by Joshua Lee. Email your weird news to josh@alibi.com.