Alibi V.13 No.17 • April 22-28, 2004

Gus Pedrotty’s Alibi interview [Video]

Gus Pedrotty—Gus, as he likes to be known—stopped by Alibi Headquarters to discuss a bid for mayor that began as idealistic—and some would say unlikely—but has since been transformed into one of the more vital and remarkable candidacies that have passed through this high desert city in ages.

Eric Williams

Alibi Celebrates Pride

Guests of the N.M. Pride Celebration join Weekly Alibi to party

We would like to thank everyone who visited our booth at the Albuquerque Pride Celebration and the wonderful folx running the beautiful event.

feature

Spring is Officially in the Air!

Alibi Spring Crawl 2004

OK, maybe it's not South By Southwest or Coachella, but it is unquestionably the best thing that's ever happened—and continues to happen—to the Albuquerque music scene. It also provides Downtown businesses with two of their best nights of the year in terms of pure revenue. I'm writing, of course, about the Alibi Crawl Series, the twice-yearly events we've been presenting faithfully and to larger and larger audiences since our inaugural Fall Crawl in August of 1999. The story actually begins years earlier, in 1994, when the popular opinion, even among the Downtown club and other business owners that were pitched on the idea originally, was that such an event was an impossibility in Albuquerque. But suffice it to say that after nine successful Crawls, the impossible has become a reality the entire community expects to take place every April and August. And even in our wildest dreams, we didn't begin to imagine that, in addition to hundreds upon hundreds of bands and solo artists, the Crawls would be embraced and enjoyed by such a diverse cross section of Burque dwellers. Folks that once avoided Downtown like a plague now visit at least twice a year. Businesses that used to approach Crawl nights by skeptically closing up shop and going home now extend their hours and invite the 12,000 or so attendees who come to each of the Crawls to listen, eat and spend their money on all the goods and services Downtown—quite suddenly—has to offer. As we wrap up the final preparations for Alibi Spring Crawl 2004, the 10th event in our series, we'd like to offer heartfelt kudos to everyone—bands, businesses, venues, sponsors, local media, city officials and the great crowds—for helping turn these events into the fantastic entertainment spectacles they've become.

Band Profiles

Alibi Spring Crawl 2004 Highlights

Past attempts to summarize the sound of every single band participating in the Crawl in one sentence proved a dismal failure. Some bands inevitably felt slighted, others were pissed that our descriptions didn't match their own delusions of adequacy. So we decided to write more extensively on performers we consider to be just a few of the many highlights of this year's Alibi Spring Crawl. If you or your band are profiled herein and are still unhappy with the description, buy an ad, you malcontent, and tell us all what you think you sound like. Call John Hankinson at 346-0660 ext. 265 to reserve your ad space today!

Crawl Chow

From burgers to burritos bigger than a baby's arm

Seven reasons why we bother listing places to eat when this is supposed to be about music: 1) Ya gotta eat. 2) You might as well eat Downtown since you're going down there anyway. 3) If you plan to eat early in the evening, then you won't be reduced to getting patted down and wanded at the door of Frontier at 3 a.m. 4) Eating before drinking will help keep your energy level up for all the "woo-hoo"-ing and fist-pumping you'll be doing later. 5) It'll also help keep you from barfing. 6) Barfing is what we call "conduct unbecoming of a lady." 7) Also, nobody wants to make out with a guy who just blew chunks all over his shoes.

What You Like About Them

The Romantics: Godfathers of Garage Pop

Back in the mid-'70s, a New York band called KISS distinguished Michigan's largest metropolis from all the other cities in the country by dubbing what had formerly been known as the "Motor City"—the automobile capitol of the world at the time—then "Motown,"—the birthplace of modern soul—as something altogether different and infinitely more memorable: "Detroit: Rock City." And rock it did. From Iggy and the Stooges and the MC5 to George Clinton, Ted Nugent and Alice Cooper, Detroit in the '60s and '70s produced some of the most influential and enduring American rock 'n' roll music and personalities since Elvis first shook his ass on a Memphis stage. And on Valentine's Day, 1977, four more of those personalities making that kind of music formed, one must assume, in some suburban Detroit garage: the Romantics, among the finest power pop bands ever catapulted on the scene from either side of the Atlantic, were born.

Crawl Band Schedule

1. Sunshine Theater (ALL AGES)

8:00 o Anesthesia

9:00 o Falling Process

10:00 o ATG

11:00 o A Summer Ends

12:00 o Phunk Junkeez

2. Moonlight Lounge (21 and over)

DJ NTox and DJ TAG open and spin segues

8:00 o Epidemik

9:00 o Nuthin' 2 Lose

10:00 o Live Fire Regime

10:45 o Snake Eyes

11:45 o Speed One & Cheops

12:45 o Michael Prophet

3. La Posada Hotel (ALL AGES)

7:00 o Rachel Heisler

7:30 o Paul Salazar

8:00 o Jenny Gamble

music

Music to Your Ears

Hey, nitwit! Alibi Spring Crawl 2004 is this Saturday, April 24. Have you purchased your wristband yet? ... Not only are we presenting our 10th Crawl on Saturday, we're sponsoring the return of Stacey Earle and Mark Stuart at the Outpost Performance Space. If you plan to attend that 8 p.m. show, you'll still have plenty of time to enjoy even more great live music at Spring Crawl. Call the Outpost at 268-0044 for more info. ... Some other noteworthy events this week: DJ Shadow and Blackalicious are scheduled to invade the Sunshine Theater for a dreamy little festival on Monday, April 26. ... Singer-songwriter Bonnie Bailiff will perform on Sunday, April 25 from 1-3 p.m. at Maison and The' at 821 Canyon Road in Santa Fe. ... On Monday night, April 26, the T-Lords Softball Club, which represents Downtown's bar and band scene and should actually be called either the Bad News Beers or the League of Extraordinarily Hungover Gentlemen, will lose their final two games of the Spring 2004 season. If you enjoy reruns of “The Keystone Cops” episodes, you're gonna love the T-Lords! ... Up and coming acoustic duo Seth and Jacob have just released their debut CD, Lick Your Mind, on Santa Fe's Frogville label. Visit www.sethandjacob.com or www.frogville.com for details on where you can pick up a copy. Having seen the duo perform at Stella Blue and being a fan of the acoustic music scene, I can honestly recommend checking them out live. ... Posthumous congratulations to bluegrass trio Mary and Mars on their appearance at South By Southwest last month. I wasn't aware they'd secured a slot until I got to Austin. Sorry, lady and gentlemen.

Blue Note

Brassum with the Dottie Grossman-Michael Vlatkovich Duo

Tuba maestro Mark Weaver has long been one of Albuquerque's most prolific and unpredictable musicians. Over the years, Weaver has involved himself in such disparate projects as the Doo Rag-ish Selsun Blue (a.k.a. the Selsuns) to California-based trumpeter Jeff Kaiser's 18-piece improvisational ensemble, Ockodektet. Tonight, though, Weaver will perform with a Los Angeles-based quartet he leads called Brassum, that includes Dan Clucas (cornet, flute), Michael Vlatkovich (trombone) and percussionist Harris Eisenstadt.

Weaver penned all nine tracks on last year's Brassum recording, Warning Lights (Plutonium); compositions that run the gamut between (almost) traditional brass band tunes ("Minus," "Movie"), the nearly atonal clang of a steel mill ("Seven Enchiladas") and sparse loneliness ("Elements"). And while some of the music here, presumably the boundary crossing solos by Weaver and his brothers in brass, is admittedly improvised, there's a structural quality within Weaver's compositions—and fleshed out by Eisenstadt with frightening precision—that adds a sort of post-bop, avant-garde feel without straying too far out in left field.

The Seventh Annual Electric 49

with Red Earth, Robert Mirabal, Native Roots and more

Friday, April 23; El Rey Theatre/Golden West Saloon (12 and over, 8 p.m.): In celebration and appreciation of all things Native American, native New Mexican and Southwestern, Red Earth presents its annual Electric 49. This year's gathering continues the seven-year tradition of being one of Albuquerque's best native festivals—boasting music by the most home-grown and treasured musicians from in and around the state.

Sonic Reducer

Comedian David Cross' second album for Sub Pop, It's Not Funny, is not only funnier than his first, Shut Up, You Fucking Baby, it's smarter, angrier and delves even more deeply into the sad current state of American politics. In fact, Cross' various indictments of Bush, Rick Santorum, Strom Thurmond and other racist, homophobic Republicans is at times so vitriolic it's painful. Funny and true, but painful. Cross is a master storyteller and funny in the same intelligent, forward thinking way that Bill Hicks was: taking sensitive, taboo and controversial topics and splaying them out unmercifully.

food

Gastrological Forecast

The highlight of Easter weekend was watching my sister dip her toast in cat drool and eat it. She was fresh from a recent victory in the kitchen, having won a minor fight I started over why she would choose Sun-Maid raisin bread instead of the gorgeous cranberry-pecan pain au levain I'd bought that morning. Her road-weary, cranky mood was perhaps buoyed by this unusual turn of events (I usually win our fights, if only with sheer persistence) and she sat happily gabbing with relatives at the coffee table, her toast-filled hand casting crumbs with every gesticulation. Then Derkins, Aunt Cynthia's aging cat, jumped up on the table for a visit, staying only long enough to allow a viscous thread of drool to escape from one of the gaps in her malocclusion and form a small puddle just to the left of my sister's toast plate. Now, my sister loves cats—she has three and she calls them her "babies"—so I think she was probably trying to stand up for cats in general when, in response to our collective eeeewwww at the sight of this puddle, she dunked her toast in the drool and chewed it up with a smile. "Cats are the cleanest animals," she said.

All the News That's Fit to Eat

Artichoke Café's (Central and Edith) expansion is nearly complete but more improvements are on the way. I finally got a chance to check out the work they did last year, converting an underused back patio into an extra kitchen, wine room and two new private dining rooms. Following a popular movement in the restaurant industry, owners Pat and Terry Keene created the new space in the hopes of attracting more business functions and private parties. The two dining rooms can be booked separately or opened up into one larger space seating up to 60 people. In addition, the couple plans to spruce up the small attached patio space. Call 243-0200 if you're looking for space for an upcoming function.

Hold Your Firewater

Our tips for a cheaper, safer, better tasting and less-filling Crawl

After months of winter hibernation, you're ready to strut your stuff at the Alibi Spring Crawl. In an effort to provide Crawlers with the best spring kick-off ever, we've compiled this handy guide to help you party long into the night. Issues like personal welfare, cop avoidance, cost efficiency and the upcoming swimsuit season all factor into a Crawl we hope will produce the least morning-after remorse.

news

Fables of the Reconstruction

Official memo reveals that even true believers see the seeds of civil war in the occupation of Iraq

As the situation in Iraq grows ever more tenuous, the Bush administration continues to spin the news with matter-of-fact optimism. According to Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, Iraqi uprisings in half a dozen cities, accompanied by the deaths of more than 100 soldiers in the month of April alone, is something to be viewed in the context of "good days and bad days," merely "a moment in Iraq's path towards a free and democratic system." More recently, the president himself asserted, "Our coalition is standing with responsible Iraqi leaders as they establish growing authority in their country."

Thin Line

With gratitude to Salon.com's "Right Hook" column (which is where "Thin Line" borrowed the idea), I offer you a highly selective sample of opinion appearing in the national media last week, surrounding President George W. Bush's press conference.

Where's the Diplomacy?

McCorkle victim of hardball politics

Watching Gov. Bill Richardson's unceremonious (some would argue deplorable) removal of business honcho Sherman McCorkle from the state's military base retention commission, one wonders, a la Bob Dole during the 1996 presidential campaign, "Where's the outrage?"

A Major Disservice to Seniors

Medicare reform discussion should be more than partisan bickering

The battle for the hearts, minds and coveted votes of America's senior citizens is now fully engaged.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Thailand—A British man has been arrested for going topless after smuggling an estimated $100,000 worth of ecstasy tablets into Thailand. “They didn't catch me at the airport,” 35-year-old Alan John Kiernan told Reuters Televison. “I got through eight customs without being stopped.” In fact, Kiernan was arrested by Bangkok police for not wearing a shirt. The Southampton resident arrived in Thailand from Switzerland last Friday and was stopped the following day in a park for wandering around without a shirt. Following his arrest, police found more than 9,000 ecstasy tablets in his pants. “Shit happens,” Kiernan, who could face the death penalty, said at a news conference.

film

Reel World

Put a Tiger in Your Television—Innovative indie media personality Carlos Pareja from New York-based Paper Tiger Television (PTTV) will be at the University of New Mexico on Thursday, April 22, to present a special video screening/lecture. PTTV is a non-profit, volunteer-based video collective founded in 1981. The purpose of PTTV is to challenge and expose the corporate control of mainstream media and to involve people in the process of making their own media. Locally, PTTV programming can be seen on Albuquerque Public Access channel 27. Pareja will be in the Lobo Room on the top floor of UNM's Student Union Building to discuss 20 years of media repair and to screen examples of Paper Tiger's ongoing media literacy projects. The screening/lecture is sponsored by UNM's P.L.A.C.E. program (Partnership in Learning through the Arts, Culture and Environment) and gets underway at 7 p.m. It is free and open to the public.

Sin Fronteras Flies Again

Film festival from across the Americas returns to ABQ

The Sin Fronteras Film Festival is a media festival created to showcase the works of socially conscious independent video and filmmakers from across the Americas. For the second year in a row, it is sponsored by UNM's Student Organization for Latin American Studies and the Latin American and Iberian Institute. This Saturday, April 24, Sin Fronteras will fill the Guild Cinema in Nob Hill with comedy, drama, documentary, animation and experimental films.

Taos Vision Quest

A second film fest rises to replace TTPIX

It's been a little over a year since the much-loved Taos Talking Picture Film Festival (TTPIX) died and went away. Earlier this month, the Taos Picture Show successfully kept up the tradition, recruiting several key players from TTPIX, including programming director Kelly Clement and artistic director Jason Silverman. Now comes another gang of film lovers dedicated to bringing film back to the streets of Taos. From Wednesday, April 23, through Sunday, April 25, the Taos Vision Quest International Film Festival will bring the spirit of independent filmmaking to Northern New Mexico.

13 Going on 30

Derivative body swap comedy needs to do a little growing up

Body swap comedies were a (thankfully) short-lived trend of the '80s. The success of Tom Hanks in Big led to a string of pale imitations like 18 Again, Vice Versa, 14 Going on 30 and Like Father, Like Son--all of which featured kids suddenly trapped in the bodies of adults. It didn't take long after the teenybopper success of Disney's Freaky Friday remake for Hollywood to jump back on the trend, however.

“Pimp My Ride” on MTV

Although most of America seems adverse to the idea of actually cleaning, renovating and decorating their houses, they are quite happy to watch TV shows about other people performing those same activities. Having burned through every variation of home trading, sweeping, monsterizing and making over, television has turned to our next most cherished possession: the American automobile. Leading the charge in the vehicular renovation movement (followed closely by TLC's “Overhaulin'”) is MTV's hilariously titled “Pimp My Ride.”

art

Culture Shock

This is one of those special years when Shakespeare and Cervantes' joint birthday on April 23 just happens to fall on a weekend. You know what that means: We party 'til dawn, brothers and sisters!

Don't Be Cruel

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? at the Cell Theatre

Personally, I'm not all that frightened of Virginia Woolf. What does scare the crap out of me is the quartet of dysfunctional, alienated weirdoes who binge drink their way through Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

Macbett

Tricklock Performance Space

The Tricklock Company is putting up a new version of Macbett, Eugene Ionesco's infamous spoof of Shakespeare's Macbeth. Wacky, funny and down-right bloody outrageous, this production, directed by Joe Feldman, is a fast and furious slice of absurdist theater that examines the demonic nature of power and corruption. The show runs Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays at 6 p.m., through May 23. $12 general, $9 students/seniors. A special catered opening gala will occur on Friday, April 23, at 8 p.m. $18. To reserve tickets, call 254-8393.

Wings

Vortex Theatre

Emily Stilson suffers a brutal stroke after a long career as a wing-walker. Arthur Kopit's play Wings follows Stilson's life in the aftermath of this tragedy as she slips in and out of consciousness. The audience glimpses her trauma from her own perspective and that of her doctors and physical therapist. This nuanced psychological play runs Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 6 p.m. through May 16 at the Vortex in a new production directed by Lou Mazzullo. $10 general, $8 students/seniors. 247-8600.

Work Done Well and Right

Three New Poetry Volumes from the Southwest

Though not a densely populated publishing Mecca like the Northeast, the Southwest is home to many small presses whose work is every bit as impressive. Tucson's University of Arizona Press recently released two ambitious, carefully crafted books of poetry: Margo Tamez's Naked Wanting (University of Arizona Press, paper, $15.95) and David Dominguez's Work Done Right (University of Arizona Press, paper, $15.95). Likewise, Albuquerque's La Alameda Press has released Michael Rothenberg's Unhurried Vision (La Alameda Press, paper, $16). This trio of books showcases the publishers' ability to produce well-crafted and beautifully designed books.

Guru for Hire

Rational Mysticism: Spirituality Meets Science in the Search for Enlightenment

Alibi V.13 No.16 • April 15-21, 2004

feature

Plundering a New Mexico Treasure

Houston-based El Paso Corporation hopes to use close ties to the White House to gain drilling access to Valle Vidal. But not without a fight.

Talk to anyone who's spent at least an hour there, or to many of the area residents who have spent decades exploring the area, and they'll tell you the Valle Vidal is one of the most beautiful places in New Mexico. It's got 2,500 elk. It's got wild turkeys. Its got Rio Grande Cutthroat Trout, the second largest Bristlecone Pine Tree in the world, and has even been ranked third best camping area in America (according to GORP.com). It's got excellent mountain biking, an awesome geological feature known as the rock wall, forested peaks, flowing meadows and clear mountain streams. It's got 750,000 Boy Scout alumni with memories of a 12-day outdoor adventure there or at the neighboring Philmont Boy Scout Ranch. More than 2,700 people from around the world apply for a chance to hunt elk there every year.

news

Newscity

~ Local ~

A new generation of homegrown scientists. With all the brainiac scientists supposedly doing brilliant work over at Sandia Labs, it only made sense to Mayor Marty Chavez that Albuquerque Public Schools somehow build a conduit to all that higher intelligence. So more than 18 months ago, Chavez and the presidents of UNM and New Mexico Tech met with Paul Robinson, Sandia Labs' president, Joey Vigil, the superintendent of Albuquerque Public Schools at the time and local business executives to hatch a plan for a new high-tech high school. It would be a public school where local students with a knack for math and science could refine their skills and carve a career path that might some day boost the local economy.

Thin Line

Missing the point. If you picked up the Albuquerque Journal on Friday, April 9, in hopes of getting some solid coverage of Condoleeza Rice's testimony before the 9-11 Commission last week, what you got was a truncated "analysis" originating from the Washington Post.

Medicaid Isn't Out of Control, Lawmakers Are

The federal deficit causes states to suffer

If we've heard it once, we've heard it a hundred times in the past 10 months: The state's Medicaid budget is spiraling out of control. That's what Gov. Bill Richardson said, the legislative leaders warned, the policy wonks opined and some political pundits editorialized.

Spending Passover at City Hall

At the April 5 meeting, city councilors unanimously passed the administration's latest version of a sex offender bill, which deletes three provisions in a previous bill struck down by the courts. The extension of a moratorium on walls built along streets until new design standards are finished also passed unanimously. Councilor Sally Mayer was absent.

Remembering a Friend ...

I've had writer's block for the past couple of weeks. At other times when that's happened I have a difficult time pinpointing the reason, but I'm clear what the cause is in this case. It's name is Chuck and he passed away last month. Until I say a few words for him, writing about the blarney of local, state and national politics just isn't going to happen.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: England—Yana Rodionova has agreed to marry circus performer Jayde Hanson, despite the fact that Hanson has stabbed her three times—once on live television. Rodionova, 23, is the assistant to Hanson, who works as a professional knife thrower. Last year, Hanson tried to break his world record for the number of knives thrown around his assistant. Unfortunately, the stunt—which was filmed for ITV's "This Morning" show—went wrong when one of the knives struck Rodionova in the head. The bloody scene was broadcast to millions of viewers. Hanson blamed the accident on fatigue. Miss Rodionova suffered minor injuries. "It didn't hurt because of the shock of it all," Rodionova recently told the British press. "I felt more sorry for Jayde. There was blood coming out everywhere and he looked so pale." The Russian-born Rodionova admitted, "I fell out of love with him for a couple days afterwards, but I love him again now." Although the mishap was actually the third time Hanson nailed her with one of his knives, she agreed to marry him soon after. "I forgive him. It was only an accident, but I think I will have to teach him to do something else." The couple is expected to tie the knot in May.

art

Culture Shock

For the last two decades, the fine folks at the Albuquerque Arts Alliance have honored the best and brightest lights in the Albuquerque arts community by bestowing them with the prestigious Bravos Award. This year the awards ceremony will be held at the Albuquerque Marriott.

Hopping Down the Bunny Trail

Spring Alternative Gallery Hop

When local artist Sherlock Terry recently scored a small grant to help pay for his artistic endeavors, he vowed to spread the wealth among the local alternative arts community. He decided to get a bunch of noncommercial art venues together, most of them centered around Downtown, and organize a gallery hop.

Writer in the Window

Guild Cinema

She is, by all accounts, a very wise woman. Georgelle's been answering random questions posed to her by strangers for two solid decades in bookstores from New York to California. You might've seen the questions, and her often witty responses, posted in the window of the Book Stop in Nob Hill or, more recently, in the window of Crane's Bill Books. This Thursday, April 15, Georgelle will make a live appearance at the Guild Cinema to answer your questions about everything from sex to God to the nature of evil to break dancing. The show starts at 9 p.m. Tickets are $10. 255-1848.

Dreams and Scenes

Java Joe's Coffeehouse

Next time you're over at Java Joe's scarfing a bagel and slurping some Joe, cast your eyes to the walls. Two local lady artists, Zelda Gatuskin and Veekee Eha, have decorated the inner sanctum of this famous Downtown hangout with some very killer cool art. Gatuskin supplies some inventive photo collages to the mix, while Eha contributes some animated watercolor paintings. Their show will only run through the month of April, so catch it now before it's too late. For details, call Java Joe's at 765-1514.

Speed Reader

The Whale and the Supercomputer: On the Northern Front of Climate Change

film

Reel World

Deadline Doom—This Thursday, April 15, is the deadline for submitting your short film or video to the Southwest Film Center's First Annual Student Film Festival. All high school and college students from New Mexico are invited to participate. Organizers are looking for films in four categories: Narrative, Music Video, Experimental and Documentary. The films will be shown in a free public film festival, April 29-May 1 at the University of New Mexico's Southwest Film Center. For complete information, including a submission form, log on to swfc.unm.edu/filmfestival.html or call 277-5608.

Kill Bill: Vol. 2

Sword-swinging sequel segues into surprising storytelling

For all his flaws, Quentin Tarantino is—let's face it—a genius. His positively giddy enthusiasm for the film medium has created some of the wittiest, grittiest cultural touchstones of the last 20 years. His enthusiasm, however, makes him a hard filmmaker to pin down. Right now, Tarantino says he wants to direct the next James Bond film, his World War II drama Inglorious Bastards, his long-promised Vega Brothers project and part of pal Robert Rodriguez' comic book adaptation Sin City. Thanks to his scattershot interests, Q.T.'s only directed five films in the last 17 years. And two of those (Kill Bill: Vol. 1 and Kill Bill: Vol. 2) are actually one movie.

On the Q.T.

An interview with Kill Bill: Vol. 2 star Michael Madsen

Although he's been in nearly 100 movies (from the acclaimed Thelma & Louise to the action-packed Relic to the family-friendly Free Willy), actor Michael Madsen will be forever burned into the minds of moviegoers as the malevolent Mr. Blonde in Quentin Tarantino's 1992 debut Reservoir Dogs.

The Cutting Edge

“The Swan” on FOX

I love TV. I really do. But I'm beginning to think that it's some kind of sick, abusive relationship. There are times that TV just doesn't treat me with the slightest ounce of respect. There are times when TV blatantly insults my intelligence. And there are times when I just want to smack TV upside its big, fat cathode ray. Take, for example, “The Swan.”

music

Music to Your Ears

Alibi Spring Crawl 2004 is just around the bend (Saturday, April 24, in the heart of Downtown), so the time has come to convey a little information as roughly 12,000 of you gear up for the first major event of spring. As reported two weeks ago, this year's Spring Crawl will feature two national acts: Detroit '80s rockers The Romantics and San Francisco psych-rockers The Brian Jonestown Massacre. In Crawls to come, we'll gradually invite more national acts in an effort to diversify and attract regional and national attention to the events. But rest assured that the Crawls will always emphasize local music. ... Please note that wristband prices have increased on day of show to $20. Do the smart thing and get your cheap, all-access (with valid and proper I.D.) passes in advance through Saturday, April 23, at noon in one of four exciting, convenient ways: buy them on the Alibi website HERE; buy them at Natural Sound in Nob Hill (255-8295); buy them at Alibi Headquarters (411 Central NW); or by them from Ticketmaster (www.ticketmaster.com or 883-7800). Beginning at 12:01 p.m. on Saturday, April 24, a wristband you could have purchased for just 15 bucks will cost you an Andrew Jackson. Pick up next week's issue, on stands Thursday, April 22, for all the details, complete venue schedules, maps, guides and all the Alibi Spring Crawl-related news you'll need. Now, go buy a wristband and prepare to join the fun!

Blue Note

Since the mid-'70s when guitarist Little Charlie Baty and harmonicist Rick Estrin first teamed up, Little Charlie and the Nightcats have been spreading their unique combination of Chicago blues, Texas swing, rockabilly—even surf music—across the States and Europe. And since the release of All the Way Crazy, their Alligator Records debut in 1987, the band have garnered raves from critics and fans alike, as well as a handful of Grammy nominations and a W.C. Handy award along the way. They've served as backing band for contemporary blues legend John Hammond on two phenomenal blues recordings and have toured with everyone from Robert Cray to the Allman Brothers.

Railroad Earth

Friday, April 16; Stella Blue (21 and over, 9 p.m.): When you think of bluegrass, your mind is drawn across the turnpike into the Delaware River Valley in the heart of New Jersey. OK, so New Jersey's among the last places in America you'd look if you were seeking the best newgrass jam band in the country, but it turns out that the Garden State is the birthplace of that very band: Railroad Earth. The sextet features some of the finest bluegass musicians working today, evidenced by recent invitations to play at some of the most prestigious bluegrass festivals in the world—Telluride and Grey Fox.

Amjad Ali Khan

Sunday, April 18; Lensic Performing Arts Center (Santa Fe, all ages, 7 p.m.)/Thursday, April 22; Outpost Performance Space (all ages, 7 p.m.): Perhaps the only thing more amazing than listening to sarod master Amjad Ali Khan play his instrument in a setting of traditional accompaniment is listening to him trade licks with jazz virtuoso guitarist Charlie Byrd. Khan's collaboration with Byrd speaks to his ability to play exceptionally in any situation on an instrument that remains largely enigmatic to Westerners. The sarod is a 19-string fretless lute-like device made of teak wood and metal indigenous to India, where Khan is acknowledged as one of India's finest classical musicians and the foremost exponent of the sarod.

Sonic Reducer

Otis Taylor is the most relevant blues artist working today, bar none. His 2003 release, Truth is Not Fiction, turned the blues on its ear with stripped-down acoustic songs that are swollen with emotion and spine-tingling urgency. With Double V, Taylor continues his journey into the darkest corners of American history, telling chilling stories of the struggle for civil rights, social unrest and spiritual longing atop perfectly hewn melodies that mine the rich traditions of African folk, African American spirituals, latter-day acoustic blues and roiling blues rock. Taylor's unconventional instrumentation and approach takes no prisoners.

food

Gastrological Forecast

Several things led up to this week's story on fish. Overfishing is an issue that has become inextricably linked to any discussion of seafood. Nobody wants to put his favorite fish on the endangered species list but purveyors and restaurants do want to give the people what they like. Omega-3 fatty acids, which I wrote about recently because egg producers have begun to sell omega-3-enhanced eggs, have really come to prominence over the past year, prompting many pundits to recommend salmon (a good source) more than ever. And though a firestorm has been brewing for years over Bush's environmental policies, it's only recently that the public has begun to make firm connections between the administration's policies and their allies (read: campaign donors) in the energy industry. In the past few weeks, we've seen an increase in the number of news stories covering Vice President Dick Cheney's energy task force fiasco. Scientists worldwide have criticized the administrations mishandling of science and specifically their attempts to play down the established link between coal-burning power plants and dangerous levels of mercury in the nation's fish. Which brings us to the dilemma: Is fish the new wonder food or will it slowly kill us all?

All the News That's Fit to Eat

The Range Café has finally arrived somewhere in between the Northeast Heights and Bernalillo. That somewhere, specifically, is the former Lindy's location on Menaul, just east of University. After weeks of renovation that transformed the space with the Range's familiar rustic and colorful theme, the café opened last week. Like its siblings, this one serves three meals a day but will surely be a favorite for breakfast (huevos con queso!). Look for a new and interesting beer and wine list at this location. Call 888-1660 for more information.

Salmon—Good and Good for You

Using canned salmon to fill up on omega-3 fatty acids

These tasty cakes are high in protein, low in fat and way cheaper to make than their crabby cousins. Plus it's very likely that you've already got these ingredients on hand, making it a cinch to throw together for last minute entertaining. Serve them as an appetizer or side dish, dressed up with a little red chile aioli and some lime wedges.

The Fish Dilemma

Wading through the murky waters of omega-3 fatty acids, mercury and PCBs

Trying to eat well can be so hard sometimes. Take fish, for example. Since omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to have a wide array of health benefits, more and more Americans are including them in their diets by taking supplements and by eating more fish. Fatty, cold-water fish like salmon and tuna boast high amounts of these beneficial compounds. But the latest furor concerns levels of toxic mercury compounds in fish, especially tuna. Women especially are caught between a dietary Scylla and Charybdis; we're urged to eat more fish for the incredible health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids but warned against eating too much fish or risk terrifying neurological damage to our unborn children.

Know Your Ingredients

Wild Caught Alaskan Salmon--It's more expensive than farmed salmon but wild-caught fish have better flavor, less mercury and other toxins and are most environmentally friendly. Look for this stuff cheaper in cans and use it for salmon cakes, burgers and in quiches.

Alibi V.13 No.15 • April 8-14, 2004

feature

BOB: Community Picks

Marla Wood--Managing director, Keshet Dance Company

Best Dance Company

Well, Keshet, of course!

Best Theatre Company

Tricklock—and not just because they are Keshet's sister company but because they are responsible for starting revolutions! Well, that and the fact that Joe Pesce is such a hottie.

Best Musical Experience That Makes It Really Difficult to Stand Still on Wednesday and Thursday Nights

500 Second Street. But there's a $5 cover and you should probably know something about drawing or painting from the figure.

Best Painter

Couldn't possibly choose.(But I do have some serious soft spots for Duvian, Jeffri, Jeremy and Dennis. Check them out at the above musical experience.)

Best Sculptor

BOB: Community Picks

Van Tate--KRQE-13 sportscaster, voice of Lobo football

Best Dessert

The German Chocolate Cake at Flying Star. It has to be the best in the world. I've had it several times and I still can't believe how good it tastes. It reminds me of the old Mary's Muffins that once was on Central across from UNM. When that place closed a lot of us felt like crying.

Best Thai Food

Thai Cuisine at Montaño and Coors. Once you taste #87 or #74 you will pack your belongings and try to move into the restaurant. The 87 is spicy ground chicken over rice. The 74 is a spicy fried rice with your choice of tofu or chicken. The lunch buffet left a brother speechless.

BOB: Community Picks

Chaz Malibu--Morning radio host, The New Hot 95.1 FM

Best Margarita

Garduño's. If you're looking for a flavored one, you have to try my personal favorite, the Coconut Margarita. Don't order a pitcher, just a glass (they're almost the same size anyway).

Best Female TV Personality

Diane Anderson. Not only is she damn good at what she does, she's also a hottie!

Best Place to Find Old School Music

Christy's Records and Tapes. Been around since I was a kid when I was looking for hard-to-find music.

BOB: Community Picks

Robin Brown--Senior, Monzano High School

Best Reason to Vote Bush in 2004

To piss off Don Schrader. Other than that, I can't think of a thing.

Best Radio Station

KUNM. Although its extreme variety is bound to be displeasing in some instances, it is the only radio station that plays anything quite original. Why, it's not even run by Clear Channel.

Best Place to Buy Used Music

Charlie's has loads of used CD's and vinyl, they play interesting music on the speakers, and the people are nice. Besides, they have ice cream. Natural Sound has a good selection, but anytime I go in there the people who work there kind of seem to growl.

Best Place to Rent Videos

BOB: Community Picks

Kristi Trujillo--Associate Manager at Buffalo Exchange/clothing fiend

Best Way to Spend a Monday Night

Head over to Atomic Cantina and see Heather and Suni host their pop quiz night. If you buy them shots, they might let you win.

The Best Way to Spend the Day After You've Ditched Work/School

First, call a friend who drives a Vespa so that you guys have a mode of transportation on a nice, sunny day. Next have lunch at, let's say, El Patio. Get some margaritas on this hot afternoon and talk about how you want to start your own revolution.

Best Cure-All for Being Sick, Hung Over, Having Allergies, etc.

Go to Frontier and order hash browns with cheese, a side of tortillas, extra honey and get some stew from the pot. Make some mini burritos and you've got instant relief—don't forget the large water.

BOB: Community Picks

Mele Martinez--Manager, The National Conservatory of Flamenco Arts

Best Local Hero

Eva Encinias-Sandoval for her incredible work providing and educating the community in our flamenco heritage.

Best Place to Find Energy to Dance for Three Hours Straight

Fei Cafe for plenty of Bubble Milk Green Tea.

Best Live Theater/Performance Space

The soon to open Disney theater at the National Hispanic Cultural Center.

Best Place to Walk to For Chicken Wings With Four or Five of Your Best Friends

Pearl's Dive on Central.

Best Place to Get a Parking Ticket

Gold Street between 2nd and 3rd.

BOB: Community Picks

Eric Griego--Vice President, Albuquerque City Council

Best Economic Development Idea for Albuquerque

To become the renewable energy capitol of North America by 2015.

Worst Place to Hide A Weapon of Mass Destruction

In front of the museum in Old Town.

Best Margarita

Wilder at Univision.

Best Shameless Sabotage of City Taxpayers

The development community's current attempts to kill PGS Impact Fees.

Best Legislation Killed by Industry Lobbying

“Scooby's Law” which would have protected kids and dogs from antifreeze poisoning.

Worst Legislation Proposed in 2004 Session

“Dooby's Law” which would have made it easier to hire cops with a history of marijuana use.

BOB: Community Picks

Martin Heinrich and Julie Hicks—Rookie City Councilor, Web Designer

Best Day Trip

One of the best, yet least known, day trips from Albuquerque is the Ojito Wilderness Study Area. Less than an hour from Albuquerque and closer than the Jemez Mountains, Ojito is the perfect place to explore on a weekend outing. You won't find babbling mountain brooks here, just New Mexico desert at its best. Parched, yet sublime landscapes made up of broken mesas and undulating badlands capped with twisted and ancient junipers that may predate the arrival of the Spanish. Ojito is truly unlike any other place we know and it keeps us coming back. Combining elements of the Bisti badlands with Santa Fe skies, Abique fossils, and southern Utah redrock, this is a place more than worth the short drive from Albuquerque.

Best Ethnic Supermarket

BOB: Community Picks

Dede Feldman—State senator from the North Valley

Best Community Action Group

You gotta realize that I'm partial to the North Valley, having vowed long ago never to go east of San Mateo. I'm so proud of the fighting spirit of Sawmill Advisory Council and later the Sawmill Land Trust that I'm beaming at their success. Also, the folks at the Rio Grande Community Farms who are trying to introduce urban kids to traditional valley agriculture on the old Anderson Fields are pretty cool, too. Common Cause, PIRG and the American Cancer Society are friends in the legislative arena.

Best Local Heros

BOB: Community Picks

Carla Aragon--KOB-TV Eyewitness News 4 anchorwoman

Best Salsa

505. I'm addicted to this stuff. It's so good, you don't even need the chips! Just drink it!

Best Bargain Store

Big Lots. It's like a treasure hunt ... and best of all, you can walk away from the place with a bag full of goodies for under $20.

BOB: Community Picks

Kenn Rodriguez--Philologist

What do I love about Albuquerque? Well, first the sky. That's the number one thing visiting poets comment on—some have said that it seems endless. I tell them it is. No one has ever argued.

BOB: Community Picks

Arcie Chapa--Host, KUNM Call-in Show

Best Place To Take Kids Out For A Stroll

Farmer's Markets. My kids get good exercise, they get to meet the folks that grow the food they eat, and I get to support local farmers who provide the freshest produce in town. Arts and crafts add to the colorful experience.

Best Place To Take Kids Out For A Hike

Rio Grande Nature Center. I get good exercise, my kids get to see the resident ducks and turtles, and point out the migratory visitors (we saw sandhill cranes earlier this year). The view of the Sandia Mountains is spectacular.

Best Venue in Which to Hear Live Music With The Kids

BOB: Community Picks

Kate Garduño--Librarian

Best Day Trip

El Malpais—It's just far enough to make you feel like you've gone somewhere, but it's still an easy day trip. There's amazing stuff to see, and it's a real kick to just wander around for hours. Also, my dog threw up an apple there. Yup.

Best Place To Get A Chocolate Fix

BOB: Community Picks

Dan Solis--Veteran Slam Poet

Best Local Politician to Go Bar Hopping With

It's gotta be Manny Aragon. I imagine Manny would have the hookup wherever we went, no waiting for a table. Hell, we probably wouldn't even have to pay for a drink in most places. He's sure to know and tell stories about New Mexico politics and politicians that would never even be hinted at by the press. And if we did have to pay, hopefully he would pick up the tab cause he would be loaded with dough from all, the, uh ’political gifts' he has received over the years.

Best Reason To Vote Bush in 2004

If you're rich, white and you love sexist, racist, homophobic, hypocritical, avaricious, moronic, liars and murderers.

BOB: Community Picks

Soobin Hur--Alibi intern and Korean exchange student, Menaul School

Best Bowling Alley

Leisure Bowl. This place is about more than just bowling. If you're planning a birthday party for your kid, Leisure Bowl offers pop-up Bumper Bowling on every lane. They will even supply the invitations! For adults, they also have drinks and karaoke.

Best Radio Station

88.3 FM. Compared to 90.5 FM, this Christian Rock music station has more information about Christian concert dates and new Christian CDs. It also offers a good variety of Christian music 24 hours a day.

Best Korean Restaurant

Yen Ching. Yen Ching serves both Chinese and Korean food. They have an excellent daily lunch buffet from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. You can try all kinds of authentic Korean dishes here. Some famous Korean dishes are Bul Gal Bi (barbecue rib), Bul Go Ki (barbecued beef), Dae Ji Bul Go Ki (barbecued pork), Dak Bul Go Gi (barbecued chicken) and Gob Chang Gui (barbecued marinated tripe). They also have a delicious Japanese sushi bar.

BOB: Community Picks

Laura A. Smigielski--Marketing Solutions

Best City Political Stinkeroo

Sally Mayer squashing the green cone art scheduled for the new I-40 Louisiana Interchange. She missed the public meeting when her constituents spoke in favor of it, sneaks it into a City Council meeting around the City Arts Board and made sure it was vetoed soundly. Now she's trying to appoint herself to the Arts Board—if that happens we'll probably end up with a giant cowboy boot as an Uptown landmark.

BOB: Community Picks

Amy Johnson--Indian Pueblo Cultural Center

Best Cultural Bargain

Indian Pueblo Cultural Center. That's right kids, there are 19 pueblos in our beautiful state. Can't make it out to each pueblo for Feast Day dances? This place has free traditional dances every weekend. Check it out.

Best Place to Fall in Love with New Mexico All Over Again

Chaco Canyon, a.k.a. Chaco Culture National Historical Park. Sure the last 20 or so miles to get there are marked by washboard dirt road madness, but once you catch site of Fajada Butte ... ah. A place not to be missed.

BOB: Community Picks

John Traub--Albuquerque Isotopes General Manager

Best Hamburger

Blake's Lota Burger

Best Fast Food

Sonic

Best Pizza

Dion's

Best Restaurant

PF Chang's

BOB: Community Picks

Martin J. Chavez--Mayor

There's a lot to like about Albuquerque, from our fabulous weather and scenic vistas to our friendly, multicultural atmosphere and terrific cuisine. From our visual and performance arts communities to our historic and contemporary neighborhoods, our recreational opportunities and special events, Albuquerque is truly unique and I am always proud to be part of it. One area where I have been getting a lot of positive feedback lately, in the Biopark: our Rio Grande Zoo, Botanic Gardens and Aquarium. I went with my family last weekend, and the facilities continue to be clean, user-friendly and fascinating. This is a great set of amenities with a lot of new attractions, so it's no wonder the Biopark is the state's number one attraction.

BOB: Night Life

Gone (forever, we hope) are the days when whiners can complain that there's nothing to do in Albuquerque after dark. As you're about to discover, there's more than enough nightlife to go around in this city—from live music and dancing to fine dining and drinking, you can't swing a dead cat in Albuquerque without hitting something fun to do with your leisure time. Furthermore, Weekly Alibi's very own Arts, Naked City (live music and entertainment) and Community and Events calendars are jam-packed with great stuff to do every day of every week. If you're not satisfied with your social life, it's only because you're not willing to miss an episode of “Cops” every now and then. We hope our readers' choices in the following categories will inspire you to have fun, relax, make new friends and become part of our vibrant community.

Best of Burque 2004

Every year, our Best of Burque issue is built on some crazy theme. In the early days, this practice proved to be a lot of fun. But in recent years, our thematic presentations have become, well, progressively more clichéd and downright cheesy. Take last year, for instance: What the hell did pirates have to do with Albuquerque in any way, shape or form, past or present? Similarly, this year we've packaged our Best of Burque issue in an undersea treasure/adventure theme. Someone apparently forgot to tell the Marketing Department there's no water here. So as I sat down to scribe this introduction to our most gargantuan issue of the year, I found myself having a hard time separating the pirate and undersea treasure themes. I did the best I could, but forgive me for occasionally straying into pirate mode. Here goes:

BOB: Consumption

If there's one thing we've figured out about Burqueños, it's that we like to stockpile our crap. And lots of it. Whether it's a backyard collection of rust-eaten Buicks or the latest gadget from Williams and Sonoma, the cult of objects is as New Mexican as a plate of huevos on Sunday morning. You can see it for yourself, too. Every weekend we spill out from our homes, money in hand, on a mission from God to scour the desert for the best deal, the biggest piece or the rarest find. Sometimes we actually find it and, miraculously, it's just a few bucks less than we expected to pay. But even if we come away empty handed, it's that satisfaction of a full-day's hunt that sends us blissfully to bed, where we dream again of acquiring junk. Blessed, beautiful junk.

BOB: Eats and Drinks

First, an explanation. While you will find, within these pages, information that will help you locate the best micro-brew/Celtic music experience or to scout locations for your Vietnamese-language remake of The Godfather, we want to remind you that we're saving the best for later. Later this year, that is, when the annual Readers' Choice Restaurant Poll hits the stands with hundreds and hundreds of ooey-gooey, scrum-diddly-umptious restaurants that have been tried and tested by our readers. So consider the “Eats and Drinks” section of our Best of Burque poll to be a mere appetizer for the very big meal to come in October.

BOB: Featured Night Life

Uh, congratulations to Amanda, Rory at Applebee's and Virginia at the Ranchers' Club. Remember ... safety first.

BOB: Life in Burque

The people, places and sights in Albuquerque make our fair city one of the finest places to live regardless of the studies that paint a gloomy picture. Just recap the past 12 months and there's plenty to cheer about. Downtown continues its revival, the media didn't uncover a single fundraising scam at the mayor's office, the Isotopes brought baseball back with a bang, Tingely Beach is finally getting a makeover and the arts are thriving like never before. And that's only a quick sample. But there are always things to gripe about and we like to do that too once in a while. So here's this year's Life in Burque winners (and losers), so one way or another, we can all feel better about ourselves. Enjoy!

BOB: Featured Consumption

If by “foreign” you mean “arty” then by all means our winner is your one stop shop. But if you translate “foreign” as “Japanese science-fiction with lots of monsters and martial arts too” then newcomer Burning Paradise is where you should be paying late fees. For a wide selection of new releases (if nothing else) Hastings hits the spot.

BOB: Featured Eats and Drinks

Still winner and champ-een! For the buhzillionth year in a row, Frontier has smothered the competition like a goopy blanket of red chile and cheese. Thanks to the 'Tier, nothing says New Mexico like eating your breakfast at 11 p.m., surrounded by epic pastels of John Wayne's likeness and, apparently, people you're scared of or scaring. For those who actually eat breakfast in the a.m., there's Flying Star Café's turkey sausage and pristine pastries, or the unbeatable slabs of bacon and drool-inducing queso at The Range Cafés. You also report that the grub at Weck's gets you out of bed on your coveted weekend morning.

BOB: Arts

We live in a city that prides itself on its skin-searing quantum creative energy. Stand on almost any street corner—especially in neighborhoods like Downtown, Barelas and Nob Hill—swing your purse in a nice wide arc, and you'll more likely than not hit an artist, an actor or a musician squarely in the jaw.

BOB: Featured Arts

As long-time readers of the Alibi already know, Chevy on a Stick (a.k.a. “Cruising San Mateo I”) always wins this category. It's some kind of law of nature. Yes, our city is filled with great and diverse pieces of monumental public art, but something about that delicious Chevy on a Stick, located at the corner of San Mateo and Gibson, perfectly symbolizes the thriving neon auto culture that has defined Albuquerque for the last 60-odd years.

BOB: Community Picks

Ambrosia Ortiz--UNM student

Best Movie Theater

Madstone. I have never been disappointed by a film experience there. Nice people, weird movies and alcohol. Who can beat that?

Best Coconut Drink

Annapurna on Yale. I have to stop myself from humming “Kokomo” every time.

Best Extinct Bookstore

Sisters and Brothers. We will miss you.

Best Looking Staff

Flying Star on Central. Damn!

Best Cheesecake

You would be surprised ... PF Chang! So Good! (In my best Teen Girl Squad voice.)

BOB: Featured Life in Burque

The big guy wins this one for the second year in a row. Seriously, who wouldn't love to go bar hopping with the guv. He's gotta have a few good stories to tell. Mayor Chavez took second, and City Councilor Eric Griego and former city councilor turned Alibi columnist Greg Payne tied for fourth. To be fair Griego probably deserved one extra vote for the entry that said, “the guy who thinks he's funny,” but the judges said no. Of course, Payne learned the virtues of sobriety the hard way, so perhaps folks thought he might be useful as a designated driver.

news

Looking Beyond Florida

ACLU focuses on

electronic voting technology

following 2000 election fiasco

In the small town of Wadley, Ga., a seat in a recent city council election was decided by two votes. But a few days later, a peculiar discovery revealed that the town's voting machines had recorded four more votes than the total number of people that had signed in to cast a ballot. In other words, the folks in Wadley had themselves a voter irregularity situation.

Thin Line

Who can't handle the truth? Newspaper editors and network TV news producers had, by their own estimation, a difficult decision to make last week when images of mutilated American corpses were transmitted home from Fallujah, Iraq.

Where There's Smoke, There's Mirrors

Bush spin diverts America's attention from the truth

You may have to dig out your old dog-eared copies of George Orwell's 1984 if you want to understand the peculiar uses of the English language that are being shoveled in our direction by the current inhabitants of the White House.

Keep an Eye on Local Politics

Important races shouldn't go unnoticed during 2004

Presidential Campaign

Tip O'Neill, the prominent former Democratic House speaker, in his oft-quoted quip said "All politics are local." This is not to be confused with the old New Mexican saying "All politicos are loco." But let's be honest: Who gives a rat's red patutee about who the next trustee in Romeroville is? You should.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Cambodia—Police in Phnom Penh have been accused of using a most unusual form of torture. Two teenage boys, arrested last Sunday night on suspicion of stealing five bags of soap powder from a parked car, say police force-fed them bananas until they got sick and confessed. Policeman Yim Simony denied any official wrongdoing. "They were hungry and annoyed and they refused to answer our questions," he told the Cambodia Daily. "But after they ate the bananas, they answered questions."

film

Reel World

Short Shorts—The Southwest Film Center at UNM is looking for a few good shorts. The First Annual SWFC Short Film Festival is a chance for aspiring young filmmakers to show off their talents. Organizers are looking for films/videos in four categories: Narrative, Music Video, Experimental and Documentary. Films should be no longer than 20 minutes and must be accompanied by a $20 admission fee. Deadline for submission is Thursday, April 15. Winners will be showcased in a series of public screenings beginning Thursday, April 29, and awards will be handed out on Saturday, May 1. For complete info, including a submission form, log on to swfc.unm.edu/filmfestival.html.

Tokyo Godfathers

Realistic, romantic mix in offbeat urban fantasy

Here in America, the Disney Corporation, the greatest stronghold of animation in the western world, continues to hemorrhage profits and forebode the end of "traditional" cartoons. The company all but insists that the recently released Home on the Range is the last non-computerized film they will bother to make. Overseas, however, animation seems to be enjoying a minor renaissance. Earlier this year, France loaned us the charming and unpredictable Oscar nominee The Triplets of Belleville. Now comes the latest work by Japanese up-and-comer Satoshi Kon. While Tokyo Godfathers isn't exactly groundbreaking cinema, it does showcase a strength and breadth of animation with which Americans seem unwilling to experiment.

Johnson Family Vacation

Poor timing and familiar plot have audiences whining, “Are we there yet?”

Amazingly enough, Johnson Family Vacation was not produced by the UPN network. Had the film premiered on the network that gave us "The Parkers," "The Hughleys," "Girlfriends" and "Moesha", the urban-friendly cast and carefree plot might have scored a few ratings points. Lost amid the early spring rush of action films, romantic comedies and kid-friendly cartoons, Johnson Family Vacation is a side trip that's just not worth the effort.

Rabbit Ears

Easter around the dial

TV-wise, Easter isn't nearly as big a holiday as, say, Christmas. Sure, there are a few seasonal specials and the occasional holiday classic. (What would Easter be without a few Cecil B. DeMille epics?). But there aren't usually enough programming choices to fill up your entire day off. That doesn't mean, of course that you can't try.

music

Music to Your Ears

Early one November morning in Seattle 11 years ago, Mia Zapata, lead singer of then up-and-coming alt.rock band The Gits (who played Albuquerque's Dingo Bar toward the end of their one and only West Coast tour), was abducted, raped and strangled to death with the hoodstring of her Gits sweatshirt, then dumped at the end of a dead-end street less than two blocks from the friend's house she'd left less than two hours earlier with the intention of catching a cab home. For a decade, Zapata's case remained cold. Then, in 2003, DNA evidence collected from Zapata's body drew a match on Florida's felon database, rendering a suspect in her murder: Jesus Mesquia. Three weeks ago, Mesquia was convicted on all counts in a Seattle courtroom and faces 20 years to life in Zapata's tragic death. Fellow Git Steve Moriarty after the verdict said, "I'm just glad he'll be in prison and we'll be living free lives." Indeed. ... This year's Alibi Spring Crawl will feature a handful of carefully chosen national acts to-be-announced. While the focus of our Crawl series remains on local music, local bands and the local businesses Downtown who support them, we'd be doing a disservice to everyone involved—fans included—if we didn't gradually push the events toward regional and, eventually, national acclaim. Albuquerque isn't Austin, and the Crawls may never be as widely regarded as South by Southwest, but we hope our humble events evolve to the point that they can't be ignored by the music industry at-large. See you Downtown on Saturday, April 24.

Blue Note

Lyrically, he's been compared to Leonard Cohen and Bruce Springsteen. But as a songwriter, tracing 26-year-old Josh Ritter's perceived lineage is slightly more challenging. Anyone with the ability to read the lyric sheets accompanying his three existing records can visualize the boyishly handsome Ritter's face buried in books by Rimbaud and Rilke. But listening to his plaintive voice toy with hook laden melodies without ever actually playing the hand is drawn in some obscure way to Nick Drake and Beth Orton and, moreover, a comforting amalgam of Bob Dylan (pre-Victoria's Secret commercials) and Sweet Baby James-era James Taylor.

Beto's Birthday Bash

Saturday, April 10; Launchpad (21 and over, 5 p.m.): It's an annual event that's become as revered as Christmas: Beto's Birthday Bash. Beto's turning 56 this Saturday, and he'd like to have all of you join him in celebration of the occasion. Many of your favorite local bands—Kaotic State, Dead On Point Five, Bulletrainmafia, Blue Bottle Flies, Concepto Tambor, Civitas, Feels Like Sunday, Los Brown Spots, Rebilt and several others—will be on-hand to provide live music and, if you show up early enough, there might just be some home-cooked food left.

Beto himself will be on-hand for spankings and such, with the giant spanking tunnel taking place at 11:59 p.m.

Lynch Mob

with Conspiracy

Wednesday, April 14; Brewster's Pub (21 and over, 9 p.m.): It's no secret that my some of my formative years were spent listening to '80s glam metal, going to '80s glam metal concerts and playing a pretty awful '80s glam metal-influenced band. The guitarist and long-time friend from that band which shall remain nameless recently entrusted several cassette tapes containing most of what we recorded between the late '80s and 1991—some of the worst music ever committed to tape—for purposes of archiving it on CD. The very fact that I would even consider spending time archiving such tripe is a clear indication that there's a part of me, however small, that still looks back fondly on those days. So it was with a fair amount of excitement that I received the news that George Lynch (and Lynch Mob) would be coming to Albuquerque on a last-minute booking.

Eyes and Ears

Longing for a return to the Golden Age of grunge? A tour through the annals of Sub Pop history? A reminder of how a handful of incredible (and incredibly resourceful) bands created the most significant musical movement since '70s punk rock? Sub Pop Video Network: Program 1 is just what you're looking for. Yes, long before the grunge look could be purchased from the Gap, and prior to bandwagonesque bands like Stone Temple Pilots and Bush ruled the airwaves, bands like Mudhoney, Beat Happening, Tad, Afghan Whigs and, yes, Nirvana, were busy meshing balls-out hardcore and punk rock with '80s metal in direct response to the Silly String 'n' Aqua Net era of rock music that nearly ruined an entire generation of MTV babies. And much of it is collected in video form on this first DVD installment from the good folks at the label that stated it all: Sub Pop.

Sonic Reducer

They either missed the window or preceded it by a few years, but either way, the first outing by Finland's Hanoi Rocks in 19 years falls flat on its glamorous face. Back in their heyday, HR could have been the European antidote to the Los Angeles community of excess that spawned Guns 'n' Roses, L.A. Guns and Motley Crue, whose singer, Vince Neil, ended HR's career by killing their drummer "Razzle" in a car accident in 1994. HR never recovered. Michael Monroe's songwriting would have been hailed in 1988, but in 2004, it needs to be put to bed forever.

art

Culture Shock

There's more to musicals than the all-too-familiar over-homogenized triteness of Oklahoma! and My Fair Lady. In honor of Ana Chavira, a frequent Musical Theatre Southwest (MTS) performer and contributor, MTS recently opened its brand spanking new Ana Chavira Theatre in the Frank A. Peloso Performing Arts Center, which also houses the much larger Hiland Theatre. The purpose of this intimate 85-seat theater is to provide a new and appropriate venue to stage alternative musicals for Albuquerque audiences.

Saving Eden

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Seasons of Life and Land at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science

Many conservatives, I've noticed, are hypocrites. Half an inch beyond the American flag lapel pins, the pretentious sanctifying of our Founding Fathers, and the blathering defenses of the Republican party's narrow, hyper-corporate brand of liberty lurks a world view that runs contrary to most of the basic principles of American democracy. When they aren't busy stripping us of the so-called inalienable rights granted to us by our Constitution, many conservative politicians busy themselves with the dismantling of one of America's finest legacies: the setting aside of federal lands for the benefit of future generations.

The Taming of the Shrew

Vortex Theatre and Albuquerque Little Theatre

Theatre-in-the-Making, the hardest working youth theater group in Albuquerque, presents a new production of Shakespeare's comedic battle of the sexes, The Taming of the Shrew. Paul Ford directs this lunatic play about a mean-spirited woman and the eccentric weirdo who tames her. The Taming of the Shrew runs Friday, April 9, and Saturday, April 10, at 7 p.m. at the Vortex Theatre. $5. 247-8600. The next week the show hops over to the Albuquerque Little Theatre, running Wednesday, April 14, through Friday, April 16, at 10 a.m. and Saturday, April 17, at 7 p.m. $6. 242-4750.

MFA Open Studio Night

Graduate Art Annex and the Maddox

UNM's talented graduate art students will open their studios to the public on the evening of Friday, April 9. Two separate buildings will host the event: the Graduate Art Annex, accessed by entering UNM at Yale and Central, and the Maddox, located at the corner of Ash and Copper. The Annex will be open from 6 to 8 p.m. and the Maddox will open its doors from 7 to 9 p.m. Casadimanza will provide live music. Set aside a couple hours to see what some of New Mexico's better up-and-coming artists have created. 277-5861.

Big Macs, Dope, Sex and Immigrants

An interview with Eric Schlosser

Eric Schlosser's first book, Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the American Meal, spent three years on the New York Times bestseller lists. The book follows our burgers from pasture to plate, and it documents damage the junk food industry inflicts on our waistlines, workers, environment and children. Book number two, Reefer Madness: Sex, Drugs, and Cheap Labor in the American Black Market, tours our nation's bizarre, often horrifying, trillion-dollar, underground illegal drug economy.

food

Gastrological Forecast

Before you work yourself into a frenzy over how few food-related categories are included in the Best of Burque poll, remember that Alibi has a separate poll just for food-related superlatives. It's called the Readers' Choice Restaurant Poll (RCRP) and it hits the stands in October, right around Balloon Fiesta time. So consider this your fair warning. You have the next six months to eat your way around town and compile a personal list of favorites, from soup to service, bread to brunch. Pay special attention to newcomers as this kind of poll (like elections) tends to favor incumbents. Is there a restaurant you think gets overlooked every year? Start recruiting your friends now. Take them with you to experience your unknown gems and when poll time comes around you can encourage your buddies to vote. If you've got ideas for new RCRP categories you can e-mail them to us at food@alibi.com. We promise we'll consider them all but don't be surprised if you don't get to vote for Best Buns on a Waiter Whose Name Starts With an "M" Who Works at an Italian Restaurant in Nob Hill.

All the News That's Fit to Eat

How long do you think it would take to eat a six-foot-tall scale model of the leaning tower of Pisa—made entirely of chocolate? That's what guests at last month's 12th annual Chocolate Fantasy gala were probably thinking as they strolled past the edible creation of Lincoln Peterkin and Oneil Watson. The pair won the first place award for Most Artistic chocolate piece before their restaurant, Jamaica Jamaica, even opened. Chef Daniel Keadle of the Hyatt Tamaya Resort took first place for Best Taste. Judges also awarded honors to Adrienne and Claire Toubbeh, Seasons Rotisserie and Grill and the Marriott Pyramid North. Chellese Restaurant in Gallup won the People's Choice award while Jamaica Jamaica took home the award Sponsors' Choice. The event grossed more than $250,000 for the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. (GD)

All Hams on Deck for a Pig-Party Primer

If your family simply adores ham at holiday time but you hate to pay high prices for a spiral-sliced sow, why not opt for a cheaper version and do it yourself? Buy a nice, big bone-in half ham from your favorite butcher. Although the ham is already cooked, you'll need to heat it thoroughly before serving.

“Gol Gol” Prasomphon's Krung Thai

A chat with the owner of a winning new Thai restaurant

Across the street from Flying Star Café on Menaul is a humble little Thai restaurant with bright, fresh food and distinctively friendly service. This week I had the opportunity to chat with the enthusiastic owner, Peerayut “Gol Gol” Prasomphon.