Weekly Alibi
 Nov 3 - 9, 2005 
The Worry Wheel
The Alibi continues to give Albuquerque what it really wants: more things to worry about. From anuptaphobia to killer bees to an interactive worry wheel, we're providing everything you need for a lifetime of anxiety.
NEWS/OPINION
Brewing a Controversy
As former Alibi photographer Singeli Agnew reports, a case which originated in New Mexico involving religious freedom and a hallucinogenic Brazilian tea saw its way to the Supreme Court this week.
MUSIC
Blue Note
Concerned about the state of Swedish jazz? Composer and pianist Bobo Stenson will prove to Albuquerque that it's alive and well.
FOOD
Eating In
Never fear! Just in time for a new flu epidemic, we're arming you with a green chile stew recipe that will pump up your immune system while those who prefer bland, Midwestern food drop like dead birds all around you.
FILM & TV
Where the Truth Lies
Losing no sleep, Devin D. O'Leary solves a sexy showbiz mystery based on a novel by the guy who wrote "Escape (The Piña Colada Song)." And for the record, everyone on our editorial staff likes making love at midnight.
FEATURE
ARTS/LIT
Pajama Men
The Pajama Men return to our fair city with laughter in mind. What will happen?

RSSRaw posts and updates from our writers with info too timely or uncategorizable for print. What, we said something stupid? Chime in, buddy.
news

The Daily Word in poverty, beisbol and cannabis

The Daily Word

More nuevomexicanos live in poverty this year compared to last. And we're still the second-most impoverished state in the nation.

The Grey Lady covers the National Police Shooting Championships and surrounding protest.

The Isotopes struck a four-year deal with the Colorado Rockies.

Scope our inaugural Cannabis Issue in print or online for editorials on politics and policy and arts and economics, a N.M. MMJ primer, a cannabis timeline, a compilation of weed quotes and more.

James Gandolfini would have turned 53 years old today. We sure do miss you, boss.

Alibi Picks

Going Over the Edge for New Mexico Special Olympics

Courtesy of Over the Edge New Mexico

Having recently discovered firsthand how important a part Special Olympics plays in the lives of many intellectually disabled New Mexicans, I take great pleasure in drawing Alibi readers' attention to one of Special Olympics New Mexico's more interesting events. The culmination of months of fundraising by individuals and businesses, tomorrow is the day both Special Olympics athletes and coaches, partners and financial supporters are rewarded for their hard workby climbing over the edge of the New Mexico Bank and Trust building (320 Gold SW) in Downtown Albuquerque and rappelling 16 stories down the west side.

While admitting that it is an exhilarating experience, one of last year's participants stresses that it is just plain unnatural-feeling (and frightening) to climb over the side of a 16-story building. I can tell you it is pretty entertaining to watch and an unusual sight in Downtown Albuquerque, almost as if Philippe Petit has come to town. The donations raised go toward a host of things including sports equipment, medals, health screenings and travel expenses. Participants start going over the edge of the building at 9am and can be watched best from anywhere along Fourth Street between Gold and Silver. Event is free. New Mexico Bank and Trust • Fri Sep 19 • 9am-4pm • FREE • View on Alibi calendar

Comedy Matters

Rage and Humor

Lewis Black talks politics, anger and making it at an older age

Lewis Black is so angry!
photos by Dana Norlund
Lewis Black is so angry!

There are a lot of angry people in America. They’re angry over police brutality, failed politics and stupidity. Especially at stupidity. Stupidity makes them so angry they could spit fire. The angriest of them all is comedian Lewis Black, who will be at Route 66 Legends Theater (14500 Central SW) on Friday, Sept. 19, channels this anger into explosive comedic energy.

Well known now for rage-fueled stand-up rants, Lewis started as a playwright in New York City.

“I wrote plays for about 20 years and on the side because I was fascinated by it. I did stand-up on occasion just for fun,” says Black. “I didn’t really care about [stand-up] as a career. I just thought of it as a way to get something I wrote up on stage.”

Black ran a theater in New York for nine years, which featured debut plays by such writers as Alan Ball and Aaron Sorkin. “I would open every show and talk about what we were doing,” says Black, “so I got very comfortable on stage. Saturday nights we’d do a free show, and I would open with my stand-up.”

Black made the shift to stand-up full time after an awful experience at a theater in Houston. After the theater lied to Black about certain finances of a production and claimed they didn’t have enough money to bring him back to see a play of his produced, a broke Black ran across town to a comedy club. “I did a 15-minute audition at the club, and they hired me for a run five weeks later. They gave me a room and a car, and so at age 40 I started going on the road with comedy.”

In 1998 Black was hired to fill time on “The Daily Show.” The hugely successful comedy and satirical news show gave Black the platform he needed to showcase his talent for hilariously articulating political failures in this country. “[‘The Daily Show’] helped me find an audience,” says Black. “But I stopped trying to figure out what my demographic was a long time ago.”

“I’m tired of people trying to tell me what I am. Both sides make me sick. I describe my politics as psychotic. It’s not about party politicsit’s about fucking stupidity.”

Lewis Black

The crux of Black’s humor is his hatred of all that’s useless and stupid. “People call me liberal, which is a word that is used pejoratively. I’m tired of people trying to tell me what I am. Both sides make me sick. I describe my politics as psychotic. It’s not about party politicsit’s about fucking stupidity.”

And so on a nightly basis Black takes the stage and vehemently and intelligently shouts about the awful state of this country’s political landscape. “On stage I feel like I have to be more insane than what’s going on outside, and right now the bar is high,” says Black. “I think the thing that has evolved here in the US is greed. I also think it didn’t help [that] the economy went belly up, and a bunch of people got screwed, and they bailed out the banks. And yes the banks needed to be bailed out but they didn’t do much for the people. So what I do is try to make people feel like they’re not crazy for being mad and make all of this funny.”

Living is hard, the state of the country is tentative at best, and daily we see news stories that make us want to scream. Watching Black is cathartic in many ways. His anger envelops the audience in a warm empathy and makes you realize you’re not alone in thinking a lot of people are stupid.

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Genevieve Mueller is a writer and comedian. She performs all over the country and runs two monthly shows in Albuquerque: Comedians Power Hour and the Bad Penguin Comedy Show at The Box. More at genevievemuellercomedy.com or on Twitter: @fromthefloorup.

Lewis Black: The Rant is Due Tour

Friday, Sept. 19, 8 to 9:30pm

Legends Theater at Route 66 Casino
14500 Central SW
rt66casino.com
Tickets: are $45-$70
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